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This is a general question. I'm working with R and ggplot2, and I'm curious to know, do plots exist, similar to box and whisker plots for quartiles that provide information for data broken up into quintiles? If so, is it possible to code the graph using ggplot2?

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Quintile plots similar to boxplots do not really exist as far as I can tell. So you'll have to make your own style. You could try make a boxplot with two horizonal centre parts (the 2nd and 3rd quintile). Is that what you had in mind? – sebastian-c Jul 24 '12 at 8:09
    
I open for suggestions and this sounds like a good option. I have some folks that are set on their data being broken up into quintiles and I'm trying to figure out how to give them something visual to represent the data with some meaningful information. Thanks for the suggestion. Any idea how I go about implementing your suggestion? – Mike Jul 24 '12 at 17:41
    
You'd have to write a function to do it manually. You'd need the functions quantile, rect and segments, I'd think. While you could do it in ggplot2, it would likely be difficult. – sebastian-c Jul 25 '12 at 1:31
    
Thanks. I'll see how it goes. – Mike Jul 25 '12 at 15:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use geom_boxplot to do this.

Here is an example from ?geom_boxplot:

ggplot(mtcars, aes(factor(cyl), mpg)) + geom_boxplot(aes(fill=factor(cyl)))

enter image description here

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First of all, read Hadley Wickham and Lisa Stryjewski's 40 Years of Boxplots.

Second, have a look at the R Graph Gallery, particularly the Box-Percentile Plot in package Hmisc.

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