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Is it possible to run bash script in a temporary folder other than the one in which it actually resides ?

My script uses a lot of filenames .I am concerned that one of the many names may coincide with others in the folder . I have named the files according to the data contained , taking reusability into consideration .

Does mktemp -d and tempfile -d do the same ? If so , can someone please illustrate its usage with an example.

Thanks in advance for the replies .

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can switch directories in a running script easily. Bash has a notion of the present working directory, which you can change at any time. For example:

dir=$(mktemp -d)

cd "$dir"
echo "Current directory changed: $PWD"

cd "$OLDPWD"
echo "Back in the old directory: $PWD"
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Is it possible to run bash script in a temporary folder other than the one in which it actually resides?

Yes, you can use cd in your script to change current directory

Does mktemp -d and tempfile -d do the same ? If so , can someone please illustrate its usage with an example.

It does not consider contents, it creates a random name and makes sure there is no such directory:

tmpdir=$(mktemp -d)
cd $tmpdir
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I don't see tempfile on a standard Linux system, and I'm not familiar with the command.

In the old days, we simply appended $$ at the end of file and directory names:

  mkdir "mydir.$$"

But, mktemp replaces that with a much more secure and safer method.

Usage is generally:

 $ my_temp_dir=$(mktemp -d -tmpdir=$temp_dir -t $template)

The $template is optional. It allows you to set a name. A template contains a series of XXX which the program can use to guarantee a unique name. If you don't specify $temp_dir, it will generally put the directory under /tmp.

The syntax takes advantage that mktemp creates a temporary directory and then echos out the name. Thus, you can capture the name of the temporary directory created.

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