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I'm currently setting up our project to deploy to users via java webstart instead of the current set up in which users run a .bat file from a shared network drive. When the application is run, it is passed an properties file argument which contains information such as database credentials which allows for the switching between different environments etc.

I would like to know if there is a way to specify this in the JNLP file and have webstart pull down the properties file from the webserver. I've spent a decent amount of time investigating this online and the only thing I could come up with was to simply specify the filename as an argument like so:

    <application-desc main-class="Main"> 
        <argument>example.properties</argument> 
    </application-desc>

and then include a separate link which let users download the properties file from the server. The issue with this is that if the JNLP file and the properties file arent downloaded to the same directory (which seems to be the default behaviour in IE) then the whole application falls over. Is there a way of bundling my properties file along with the other resources in the JNLP file or am I going about this in a completely incorrect fashion? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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2 Answers 2

You can set the properties in the .jnlp file itself instead of having a separate properties file. http://www.coderanch.com/t/200871/JNLP-Web-Start/java/Properties-files-JNLP

Other solutions are:

  • Put the properties file inside the main jar or in a separate jar and add it as a resource.
  • Put location of the properties file as a property or as a main argument and download it from the program itself.
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Looks like the jnlp is an XML file which includes a list of jar files to be placed in your classpath.
If you include a properties file in one of your jars then you can read it using this.getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("mypropsname.properties").

Do all your users need the same properties file?

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