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I'm quite new to the Jackson library (version 1.9). I'm using it only since a couple of weeks, and I find it very flexible and time-saving when it's about serializing and deserializing objects in Java.

I'm experiencing troubles, though, into deserializing "flat" JSONs to a class which is a composition of another, when both are meant to be immutable.

My situation is pretty much the following:

class Foo {

    private final String var1;

    Foo(String var1) {
            this.var1 = var1;
    }
    // getters omitted
}

class A {
    private final Foo foo;
    private final String var2;

    A(/* @JsonUnwrapped doesn't work here */ Foo foo, String var2) {
            this.foo = foo;
            this.var2 = var2;
    }

    @JsonUnwrapped
    Foo getFoo() {
        return foo;
    }

    String getVar2() {
        return var2;
    }
}

class B extends Foo {
    private final String var2;

    B(String var1, String var2) {
            super(var1);
            this.var2 = var2;
    }
    // getters omitted
}

And the JSON to deserialize is something like this:

{ "var1" : "some_value", "var2" : "some_other_value" }

The question is: is there an annotation-based way (so, without the need of using a custom deserializer) to tell Jackson to compose the given JSON to a 'A' instance? I've tried using the @JsonUnwrapped attribute for the Foo argument in class 'A' constructor, but it's not supported in multi-argument constructor as it would need a JsonProperty to work (which doesn't make sense, because there is actually no single property for those items). Serialization, instead, works perfectly using this pattern.

It would also work with a non-immutable class by using separate setters, but I'd like to know if there's a way to do the same by only using the constructors (or a builder, which would make sense as in reality the fields are much more than the one in the example).

The very same method obviously works with class 'B' which inherits from 'Foo'.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Are you using 1.9 instead of 2+ for some reason? – Programmer Bruce Jul 23 '12 at 21:49
    
I've started working with the Jackson version bundled with the google-http-java-client, which is currently the 1.9.4, then I went on preferring the use of Jackson itself instead of the higher level pluggable JSON parsers of the Google library (which has much less support for annotations). – fast3r Jul 24 '12 at 8:32
    
Anyway,'s nothing that would prevent me from using the 2.0 version, except for any (supposedly) known issues. What's more, I'm really curious about trying the Afterburner module, which is supposed to speed up JSON data-binding by reducing the reflection overhead link – fast3r Jul 24 '12 at 8:38
    
One more thing that might help (not sure): Jackson 2.0 adds support for 'builder-style' pattern. I haven't tried using combination of @JsonUnwrapped and builders, but theoretically it should be easier to support that combination. – StaxMan Jul 24 '12 at 17:05
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note that Jackson's deserialization processing doesn't necessarily respect the immutability of final fields. So, a simple approach would be to just provide no-argument (private) constructors for Jackson to use.

import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonAutoDetect.Visibility;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonUnwrapped;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.PropertyAccessor;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

public class JacksonFoo
{
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
  {
    // {"var1":"some_value", "var2":"some_other_value"}
    String jsonInput = "{\"var1\":\"some_value\", \"var2\":\"some_other_value\"}";

    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper().setVisibility(PropertyAccessor.FIELD, Visibility.ANY);

    A a = new A(new Foo("some_value"), "some_other_value");
    System.out.println(mapper.writeValueAsString(a));
    // output: {"var1":"some_value","var2":"some_other_value"}

    A aCopy = mapper.readValue(jsonInput, A.class);
    System.out.println(mapper.writeValueAsString(aCopy));
    // output: {"var1":"some_value","var2":"some_other_value"}
  }
}

class Foo
{
  private final String var1;

  Foo(String var1) {this.var1 = var1;}

  private Foo() {this.var1 = null;}
}

class A
{
  @JsonUnwrapped
  private final Foo foo;
  private final String var2;

  A(Foo foo, String var2)
  {
    this.foo = foo;
    this.var2 = var2;
  }

  private A()
  {
    this.foo = null;
    this.var2 = null;
  }
}

If you really don't want to provide such (extra) constructors, then it would be nice if a similar solution could be devised using @JsonCreator, but I wasn't able to get such a thing to work. So, I recommend logging an enhancement request at https://github.com/FasterXML/jackson-core/issues, maybe to better support annotating a @JsonCreator argument with both @JsonUnwrapped and @JsonProperty.

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is probably the only working in this situation. However, I'm using final fields to force immutability hence thread safety without the need of using volatile fields, and I'm assuming that Jackson doesn't use reflection to set fields when providing a valid annotated constructor. Using reflection would probably lead to possible memory visibility issues on that classes, and this is what I was trying to avoid using immutable classes. I think there is no other solution than querying an enhancement request to Jackson: thank you very much for your answer! – fast3r Jul 23 '12 at 22:41
    
You are correct in that if a @JsonCreator is used to pass a property value, no setter will be used. – StaxMan Jul 24 '12 at 17:04

Unfortunately there are certain combinations of features that may not be possible to implement properly; and this may be one of those (I am not 100% sure: feel free to file a Bug/RFE for Jackson github issues or Jira). This is because the way @JsonUnwrapped and @JsonCreator both require potential reordering of data; and also because the order of creating actual instance complicates things. So while conceptually this should be possible, there may be implementation difficulties.

As to Jackson 2.0: I would definitely try it over 1.9 because some parts of @JsonUnwrapped handling have been improved; and any fixes/improvements will be added there. 1.9 branch will get bugfixes backported wherever possible, but no new features will be added.

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