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Rails console, how to stop output of return value?

Consider this session in IRB:

>> for a in 1..5 do
?>     puts a
>> end
1
2
3
4
5
=> 1..5
>> 

How do I suppress the output => 1..5? This is important if I do this in a Rails console session:

for post in Post.find(:all) do
    if post.submit_time > Time.now
        puts "Corrupted post #{post.id} is from the future"
    end
end

I don't want all the Posts to be printed as an array at the end. How do I suppress that output?

I am sure there are other ways of doing this, like find_each or a Ruby script but I am more interested in doing this in an interactive session.

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marked as duplicate by the Tin Man, pjumble, mu is too short, Beerlington, j0k Jul 24 '12 at 7:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
See similar questions here, here, and a blog post here –  pjumble Jul 23 '12 at 21:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Just add nil to the end of your command. It doesn't kill irb's response line, but if you have some large object, it avoids blasting your screen.

1.9.3p194 :036 > for a in 1..5 do; puts a; end; nil
1
2
3
4
5
 => nil 
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This is core IRB functionality. You type an expression in, it prints its value. In this case, the value is 1..5. Other output is just a side effect.

You can, however, "minimize" returned (and printed) value. So, instead of big array of fat AR models, you can return something small.

Try something like this:

% irb
1.9.3p194 :001 > for a in 1..5 do
1.9.3p194 :002 >     puts a
1.9.3p194 :003?>   end; nil
1
2
3
4
5
 => nil 
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You can simply append a semicolon (;) to your command, which will actually defer running the command till the next thing executes, and IRB never prints it's result. This is quicker than also typing nil, and the side-effects are not very noticeable if you just run another command right after.

Quick example:

irb(main):001:0> def foo; puts 'foo'; end
=> nil
irb(main):002:0> foo
foo
=> nil
irb(main):003:0> foo;
irb(main):004:0* 42
foo
=> 42
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