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if i have a graph that looks like:

N3->member_of->N1
N2->knows->N1
N3->likes->N2
N4->member_of->N1
N5->likes->N2

Is there a way to do a single query that will do the following:

  1. If started at N3 will return N2
  2. And that same query started at N4 will return N2
  3. And that same query started at N5 will return N2

(preferably in gremlin)

EDIT: Clarification: I can go through up to a 2nd degree connection, as long as the first degree relationship is "member_of".

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I don't understand how N4 can return N2. –  Robert Harvey Jul 23 '12 at 22:44
    
through it's relationship to N1... –  Z Jones Jul 24 '12 at 1:11
    
I guess I should have made it clear: I can go through up to a 2nd degree connection, as long as the first degree relationship is "member_of" –  Z Jones Jul 24 '12 at 1:13
1  
If the nodes are connected in some way, you can do the query in Gremlin. However, I have no idea what you're trying to do so I can't give you an example. Please clarify and just state in words exactly what you are trying to do. –  espeed Jul 24 '12 at 4:17
    
Your clarification wasn't, so much. It would be awesome if you'd tell us about your domain :) –  Matt Luongo Aug 10 '12 at 21:11
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5 Answers

Pretty old question, but since nobody came up with a Gremlin solution, here it is:

I took Bobbys initialization script:

g = new TinkerGraph()
(1..5).each { g.addVertex(it) }
g.addEdge(g.v(3), g.v(1), "member_of") 
g.addEdge(g.v(2), g.v(1), "knows")
g.addEdge(g.v(3), g.v(2), "likes")
g.addEdge(g.v(5), g.v(2), "likes") 
g.addEdge(g.v(4), g.v(1), "member_of")

And here's your Gremlin query:

gremlin> g.v(3).copySplit(_().out('likes'), _().out('member_of').loop('start'){true}{true}.in('knows')).exhaustMerge().dedup()
==>v[2]
gremlin> g.v(4).copySplit(_().out('likes'), _().out('member_of').loop('start'){true}{true}.in('knows')).exhaustMerge().dedup()
==>v[2]
gremlin> g.v(5).copySplit(_().out('likes'), _().out('member_of').loop('start'){true}{true}.in('knows')).exhaustMerge().dedup()
==>v[2]

Cheers, Daniel

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this is how it would look in cypher:

1: start n=node(3) match n-[:LIKES]->m return m;
2: start n=node(4) match n-[:MEMBER_OF]-m-[]-k return k;  (will return n2,n3. if you want n2 only match n-[:MEMBER_OF]-m-[:KNOWS]-k )
3: the same as 1)
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so there's no way to concatenate/de-dupe the results with a single query, right? –  Z Jones Jul 24 '12 at 22:08
    
See my answer for a de-deduped variation. –  Matt Luongo Aug 10 '12 at 22:01
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not sure your setup is correct, tried to do it here: http://tinyurl.com/d2mjkj2 - the setup correct?

If the first relationship type needs to be member_of then N5 should not return N2. Otherwise, you can do something like

start s=node(3,4,5) match s-[r1:member_of]->()<-[r2*0..1]-end return s,end

to return patterns that start with a member_of relationship, and then have 0 or 1 relationships of any type. Tighten this up if you want, see http://docs.neo4j.org/chunked/snapshot/query-match.html#match-variable-length-relationships for details.

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First create your graph in a Gremlin Groovy shell using a TinkerGraph:

g = new TinkerGraph()
(1..5).each { g.addVertex(it) }
g.addEdge(g.v(3), g.v(1), "member_of") 
g.addEdge(g.v(2), g.v(1), "knows")
g.addEdge(g.v(3), g.v(2), "likes")
g.addEdge(g.v(5), g.v(2), "likes") 
g.addEdge(g.v(4), g.v(1), "member_of")

It sounds like you want a query that starts at vertices 3, 4, or 5 and returns vertex 2. The queries below use the algorithm:

  • Get vertex 'x'
  • Get both incoming and outgoing adjacent vertices
  • Loop over both again until we either loop 3 times or find a vertex with id "2"
  • Dedup results by getting the next() member of the pipe
gremlin> g.v(3).both.loop(1) {it.loops < 3}{it.object.id == "2"}.next()
==>v[2]
gremlin> g.v(4).both.loop(1) {it.loops < 3}{it.object.id == "2"}.next()
==>v[2]
gremlin> g.v(5).both.loop(1) {it.loops < 3}{it.object.id == "2"}.next()
==>v[2]

You might also find the Gremlin documentation on the path pattern to be useful.

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Erm, this doesn't seem to really answer the intent of the question. Isn't there a reason he is mentioning relationship types? –  Matt Luongo Aug 10 '12 at 20:41
    
I'm ignoring the contradiction in the requirements, viz. N5->likes->N2, "that same query started at N5 will return N2", and "I can go through up to a 2nd degree connection, as long as the first degree relationship is 'member_of'". –  Bobby Norton Aug 10 '12 at 21:26
    
Those aren't necessarily contradictions (though they are pretty muddy). He could mean "give me all related nodes of a node that are not a group, and then all related nodes of a group the node is in". Unfortunately his example graph doesn't include that case, so we don't know. –  Matt Luongo Aug 10 '12 at 21:29
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Is the idea that you want to return all incoming and outgoing relationships of a node (person?), and all related nodes of any group of which a person is a member? So "groups" commute their relationships on "members"?

If so, and assuming recursive groups aren't allowed, I've come up with an alternative graph that might illustrate your use case (as I understand it) more clearly -> http://console.neo4j.org/?id=wyr207

If you run

start n=node(5) match n-[?:knows|likes]-related, n-[?:member_of]->group-[:knows|likes]-other_related return related, other_related

on the graph, related would return all directly related nodes, and other_related all other nodes returned from a group, if the node is a member of a group. Combining those is beyond my Cypher ability, but they will be de-duped AFAIK (no nodes in related will be included in other_related).

Try the query in the console link with a few different node ids (N5 has a node id of 1) and see if that's what you were thinking. It would be simple to add relationship direction, etc.

Translating this to Gremlin is a tad bit tedious (pattern matching in Cypher is more natural), but LMK if this is in the right direction and I'll do it.

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