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I am trying to make a simple calculator to determine whether or not a certain year is a leap year.

By definition, a leap year is divisible by four, but not by one hundred, unless it is divisible by four hundred.

Here is my code:

def leapyr(n):
    if n%4==0 and n%100!=0:
        if n%400==0:
            print n, " is a leap year."
    elif n%4!=0:
        print n, " is not a leap year."
print leapyr(1900)

When I try this inside the Python IDLE, the module returns None. I am pretty sure that I should get 1900 is a leap year.

share|improve this question
    
1900 is not a leap year. But 2000 is. Also 2000 and 1900 are both divisible by 100, so you will never get 2000 as a positive hit. –  StarPilot Oct 15 '14 at 15:25

11 Answers 11

import calendar
print calendar.isleap(1900)

Python provides this functionality already in the library module 'calendar'.

share|improve this answer

You test three different things on n:

n % 4
n % 100
n % 400

For 1900:

1900 % 4 == 0
1900 % 100 == 0
1900 % 400 == 300

So 1900 doesn't enter the if clause because 1900 % 100 != 0 is False

But 1900 also doesn't enter the else clause because 1900 % 4 != 0 is also False

This means that execution reaches the end of your function and doesn't see a return statement, so it returns None.

This rewriting of your function should work, and should return False or True as appropriate for the year number you pass into it. (Note that, as in the other answer, you have to return something rather than print it.)

def leapyr(n):
    if n % 400 == 0:
        return True
    if n % 100 == 0:
        return False
    if n % 4 == 0:
        return True
    else:
        return False
print leapyr(1900)

(Algorithm from Wikipedia)

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for identifying logic errors. Still, the OP's code does not contain a return statement. Fixing the errors that you've pointed out here will not help with that. –  inspectorG4dget Jul 23 '12 at 23:11

Your function doesn't return anything, so that's why when you use it with the print statement you get None. So either just call your function like this:

leapyr(1900)

or modify your function to return a value (by using the return statement), which then would be printed by your print statement.

Note: This does not address any possible problems you have with your leap year computation, but why you are getting None as a result of your function call in conjunction with your print.

Explanation:

Some short examples regarding the above:

def add2(n1, n2):
    print 'the result is:', n1 + n2  # prints but uses no *return* statement

def add2_New(n1, n2):
    return n1 + n2    # returns the result to caller

Now when I call them:

print add2(10, 5)

this gives:

the result is: 15
None

The first line comes form the print statement inside of add2(). The None from the print statement when I call the function add2() which does not have a return statement, causing the None to be printed. Incidentally, if I had just called the add2() function simply with (note, no print statement):

add2()

I would have just gotten the output of the print statement the result is: 15 without the None (which looks like what you are trying to do).

Compare this with:

print add2_New(10, 5)

which gives:

15

In this case the result is computed in the function add2_New() and no print statement, and returned to the caller who then prints it in turn.

share|improve this answer
    
It might help to clarify that printing does not return a value. The OP must explicitly call return in order to actually return a value –  inspectorG4dget Jul 23 '12 at 23:06
    
@inspectorG4dget good point, I just added mention of the return statement, I'll see if I can clarify this further. Thanks. –  Levon Jul 23 '12 at 23:07
1  
@Downvoter: would you like to provide a reason? This is a fairly well written answer –  inspectorG4dget Jul 23 '12 at 23:09
    
I don't think adding a return statement will solve the problem. The code provided by OP is wrong as pointed in the other answer. You didn't fix the logical errors (and OP doesn't need a return code. He just prints the information!) –  JBernardo Jul 23 '12 at 23:10
    
@JBernardo My answer explains why OP is getting None .. calling a function without return with a print statement will print None. I am not fixing her leap year code. –  Levon Jul 23 '12 at 23:14

The whole formula can be contained in a single expression:

def is_leap_year(year):
    return (year % 4 == 0 and year % 100 != 0) or year % 400 == 0

print n, " is a leap year" if is_leap_year(n) else " is not a leap year"
share|improve this answer

It is much better to rely on someone else's calculation of a leap year than roll your own. You can use the Python datetime module to do this:

from datetime import datetime

def is_leap_year(year):      
    try:                     
        datetime(year, 2, 29)
        return True          
    except ValueError:       
        return False         

If you really have to use the definition of a leap year you gave, you should modify the function to return a True/False value, and print the answer from the code that calls it.

You also have two mistakes in your code - it wouldn't return any values for things like 1904 (due to missing 'else' for inner 'if' statement), or for things like 1900 (missing final 'else' clause).

You can make your code easier to understand, and less vulnerable to mistakes like this, by noting that if 'n % 400 == 0', then 'n % 100 == 0' and 'n % 4 == 0' too, and if 'n % 100 == 0' then 'n % 4 == 0'. You can then re-order:

def is_leap_year(year):  
    if year % 400 == 0:
        return True
    elif year % 100 == 0:
        return False  
    elif year % 4 == 0:
        return True  
    else:
        return False

But this is really why you should use the simpler method I included first.

share|improve this answer

Here are another 2 ways. Codes from pythonchallenge Lv15:

from datetime import *

def isleap(year):
    d = date(year, 3, 1)
    return (d - timedelta(days=1)).day == 29

Code 2:

def isleap(year):
    try:
        date(year,2,29)
        return True
    except ValueError: return False
share|improve this answer
import datetime
return datetime.datetime(year, 12, 31).timetuple().tm_yday == 366
share|improve this answer

The most efficient algorithm, from Wikipedia, is:

def leapyr(n):
    if n % 4 != 0:
        return False
    elif n % 100 != 0:
        return True
    elif n % 400 != 0:
        return False
    else:
        return True
share|improve this answer

As simple as 1, 2....

   def leap_year(y):
    if y % 4 == 0 and y % 100 != 0:
        print("True (Non-Centurial)")
    else:
        if y % 400 == 0:
            print("True (Centurial)")
        else:
            print("False")
    pass
share|improve this answer

As a one-liner:

def is_leap_year(year):
    """Determine whether a year is a leap year."""

    return year % 4 == 0 and (year % 100 != 0 or year % 400 == 0)

It's similar to the @mark's answer, but short circuits at the first test (note the parenthesis).

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Based on all the answers that have been given (and that I have commented on and upvoted), I have compiled the following answer:

def leapyr(n):
    if not n%400:
        return True
    elif not n%100:
        return False
    elif not n%4:
        return True
    else:
        return False

OR, you could do what DReispt suggests:

import datetime
def leapyr(n):
    d = datetime.datetime(n, 2, 28)
    d += datetime.timedelta(1, 0, 0)
    return d.month == 2

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
1  
No it doesn't help, since it's identical to the other answers. –  Mark Ransom Jul 24 '12 at 0:28

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