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Using Git, is there a way to tell it to accept a self signed certificate?

I am using an https server to host a git server but for now the certificate is self signed.

When I try to create the repo there for the first time:

git push origin master -f

I get the error:

error: Cannot access URL     
https://the server/git.aspx/PocketReferences/, return code 22

fatal: git-http-push failed
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1  
How do you know that the issue is the certificate? –  Amber Jul 23 '12 at 23:11
    
From a PC instead another user's Git tool lets them ignore the certificate and it works. From a Mac, I can't figure out how to ignore. –  BahaiResearch.com Jul 23 '12 at 23:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 97 down vote accepted

Try:

git config http.sslVerify false

Add the --global flag if you want it set to false for every repository on your Mac. From the man page of git config:

http.sslVerify
    Whether to verify the SSL certificate when fetching or pushing over HTTPS.
    Can be overridden by the GIT_SSL_NO_VERIFY environment variable.

A few other useful SSL configuration options:

http.sslCert
    File containing the SSL certificate when fetching or pushing over HTTPS.
    Can be overridden by the GIT_SSL_CERT environment variable.

http.sslKey
    File containing the SSL private key when fetching or pushing over HTTPS.
    Can be overridden by the GIT_SSL_KEY environment variable.

http.sslCertPasswordProtected
    Enable git's password prompt for the SSL certificate. Otherwise OpenSSL will
    prompt the user, possibly many times, if the certificate or private key is encrypted.
    Can be overridden by the GIT_SSL_CERT_PASSWORD_PROTECTED environment variable.

http.sslCAInfo
    File containing the certificates to verify the peer with when fetching or pushing
    over HTTPS. Can be overridden by the GIT_SSL_CAINFO environment variable.

http.sslCAPath
    Path containing files with the CA certificates to verify the peer with when
    fetching or pushing over HTTPS.
    Can be overridden by the GIT_SSL_CAPATH environment variable.

Coincidentally, you can override any config variable by passing -c name=value to git, so this works:

git -c http.sslVerify=false clone https://domain.com/path/to/git

Although for one-off temporary solutions, I prefer the syntax in Flow's answer.

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Perfect. Thanks! –  JJMpls Oct 8 '13 at 19:20

You can set GIT_SSL_NO_VERIFY to true:

GIT_SSL_NO_VERIFY=true git clone https://domain.com/path/to/git

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6  
I like this answer more, because its a temporary solution accepting broken certificates. –  willsteel Nov 29 '13 at 13:19
1  
You can also use the -c flag on git to modify a config value for a single command. I think this syntax is cleaner, though. –  Christopher Jan 9 at 3:22
1  
Ahh, I didn't know about -c in git. I actually think that it's the cleaner solution instead of polluting the environment. :) –  Flow Jan 9 at 9:35
2  
+1 b/c it can work through intermediaries like pip. –  Skylar Saveland Jan 30 at 15:49

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