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I have this script that does only the parent folder, it does not rename sub folders and files - i'm hoping to get it to strip all non numeric with a _ to it.

#!/bin/bash
for f in *
do
   new="${f// /_}"
   if [ "$new" != "$f" ]
   then
      if [ -e "$new" ]
      then
         echo not renaming \""$f"\" because \""$new"\" already exists
      else
         echo moving "$f" to "$new"
         mv "$f" "$new"
      fi
   fi
done
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Getting the file and directory list:

To operate on files recursively, using find is a better solution compared to globs. I would recommend populating a bash array with the file names before you start operating on them. Also I think doing this one step at a time, directories then files, would be prudent. You don't want to rename a directory and then later while renaming a file find that the file does not exist. It is also important that the script works on progressively deeper levels on the filesystem hierarchy for the same reason (hence the use of sort below).

Operating on the lists:

Once you have the list, you can call on a common shell function to do the file or directory name normalising and renaming. Please note the importance of quoting the names properly to get what you want. This is extremely important since bash (or any shell for that matter) uses spaces as word boundary while parsing the command line.

The script:

The following script (named ./rename_spaces.bash in the example output below) should do what you want. To add your own weird characters, add them to the weirdchars variable. Note that you need to escape the characters as appropriate (e.g. the single quote has been escaped). The script skips over with a message if the new file name exists. This also means it will print the message for trivial renames (file names that did not have weird characters in their original names). This can be annoying to some people (e.g. me :-p)

#!/bin/bash

# set -o xtrace # uncomment for debugging

declare weirdchars=" &\'"

function normalise_and_rename() {
  declare -a list=("${!1}")
      for fileordir in "${list[@]}";
      do
          newname="${fileordir//[${weirdchars}]/_}"
          [[ ! -a "$newname" ]] && \
            mv "$fileordir" "$newname" || \
                echo "Skipping existing file, $newname."
      done
}

declare -a dirs files

while IFS= read -r -d '' dir; do
    dirs+=("$dir")
done < <(find -type d -print0 | sort -z)

normalise_and_rename dirs[@]

while IFS= read -r -d '' file; do
    files+=("$file")
done < <(find -type f -print0 | sort -z)

normalise_and_rename files[@]

Here is a sample output with a directory tree with directories and files with spaces in there names before and after running the above script.

$ tree
 .
 ├── dir1
 │   ├── subdir1\ with\ spaces
 │   │   └── file1
 │   └── subdir2\ with\ spaces&weird\ chars'
 │       └── file2
 ├── dir2
 │   ├── subdir1\ with\ spaces
 │   │   └── file1\ with\ space
 │   └── subdir2\ with\ spaces
 │       └── file2\ with\ space
 ├── dir3
 │   ├── subdir1
 │   │   └── file1
 │   ├── subdir2
 │   │   └── file2
 │   └── subdir3
 │       └── file3
 └── rename_spaces.bash

 10 directories, 8 files
 $ ./rename_spaces.bash
 $ tree
 .
 ├── dir1
 │   ├── subdir1_with_spaces
 │   │   └── file1
 │   └── subdir2_with_spaces_weird_chars_
 │       └── file2
 ├── dir2
 │   ├── subdir1_with_spaces
 │   │   └── file1_with_space
 │   └── subdir2_with_spaces
 │       └── file2_with_space
 ├── dir3
 │   ├── subdir1
 │   │   └── file1
 │   ├── subdir2
 │   │   └── file2
 │   └── subdir3
 │       └── file3
 └── rename_spaces.bash

 10 directories, 8 files

Note: Implementing the script to "do the right thing" for anything non-alphanumeric seems to be non-trivial. For example, I am not sure how to deal with dots or pre-existing underscores or other "regular" allowed characters in the file or directory names.

Identifying undesirable/special characters in a generic way is also a problem. It is even more complicated in international language environments. I do not know any easy way of saying allow "only numerals or characters from the English alphabet". If anyone has ideas, please go ahead and post an answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi there, this seems like the perfect solution for me thus far. Is it too much to ask you if you can also replace anything that is not alphanumeric with a _ as well? I have some accents, symbols within the folders and files. thanks again. –  thevoipman Jul 24 '12 at 14:54
    
@thevoipman take a look at my edit. I added support for arbitrary special characters to the script and added a note on how to configure it in the text. Have fun. :) –  suvayu Jul 24 '12 at 18:27
    
I reread your comment, and tried to change the script to do the right thing for anything non-alphanumeric. But it seems to be non-trivial. Read my note at the end of the answer. –  suvayu Jul 24 '12 at 18:51
    
+1 Very good answer, with close attention to detail. The only small issue is that it silently fails to rename a file if another file already exists with the same target name ("odd'name" and "odd_name", for example). Printing such file names to stderr and aborting is probably sufficient, so the user can resolve the collision manually. –  chepner Jul 24 '12 at 20:48
    
+10 for @suvayu - I do understand what you're saying about dots and _ - perhaps we can keep/ignore those since we're using it as placeholders. I will test the new script and get back to you. –  thevoipman Jul 24 '12 at 21:52

You can also try running the command recursively (there's probably a way to do this without calling the same script, but I can't get it to work right now):

Say this script is in your path or here /usr/local/bin/remove_spaces.sh:

#!/bin/bash 

for f in *
do
   if [ -d "$f" ]
   then
      cd "$f"
      /usr/local/bin/remove_spaces.sh
      cd ..
   fi

   new="${f// /_}"
   if [ "$new" != "$f" ]
   then
      if [ -e "$new" ]
      then
     echo not renaming \""$f"\" because \""$new"\" already exists
      else
     echo moving "$f" to "$new"
     mv "$f" "$new"
      fi
   fi
done

So you'd essentially check if the current file f is a directory, if so, cd to it and rerun the command, then cd back out and do the renaming if needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this is getting a lot more complicated then I thought. I thought I can do something like mv -R * abc+1.* then done :) b –  thevoipman Jul 24 '12 at 0:04
    
@thevoipman I only added the first if block, everything else is the same as your script. –  Jon Lin Jul 24 '12 at 0:07
    
This one worked for me ! Neat and Perfect ! –  Vivek Sampara Dec 6 '12 at 6:53

In recent versions of bash, you can use

for f in **

You might need to set the globstar option in order to make it work:

shopt -s globstar
share|improve this answer
    
Where do i put that shopt -s globstar? –  thevoipman Jul 23 '12 at 23:44
    
@thevoipman: anywhere before the first usage of **. –  choroba Jul 23 '12 at 23:45
    
Here's what I got: sh re.sh re.sh: line 2: shopt: globstar: invalid shell option name –  thevoipman Jul 23 '12 at 23:53
    
@thevoipman: Do not use sh to call a bash script, use bash: sh turns on a special sh-compatibility mode that disables lots of features. Or, your bash might be too old to support the feature. –  choroba Jul 23 '12 at 23:55
    
Hi again, just did so and here's what it states: bash re.sh re.sh: line 2: shopt: globstar: invalid shell option name –  thevoipman Jul 24 '12 at 0:00

If filenames can't contain tabs or newlines (note the quotes):

IFS="$(printf '\n\t')"
for file in $(find .) ; do
  COMMAND "$file" ...
done

See also Filenames and Pathnames in Shell

share|improve this answer

Edit: Sorry, I forgot about the whitespace. My standard way of handling that is a read loop (assumes files cannot have newlines in the name)

find | {
read f
while [ -n "$f" ]
do
    # process "$f" (always with the quotes)
    read f
done
}
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't work, the spaces in the filenames makes them separate "files". So if you had a directory "qwe asd" with a space, f would be "qwe", then "asd". –  Jon Lin Jul 23 '12 at 23:36
    
@JonLin that's correct, am waiting for a solution to overcome this mater. –  thevoipman Jul 23 '12 at 23:45
    
Good point. I forgot about the whitespace. Have added it –  Sodved Jul 24 '12 at 13:44

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