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I'm trying to figure out how to handle events using coroutines (in Lua). I see that a common way of doing it seems to be creating wrapper functions that yield the current coroutine and then resume it when the thing you're waiting for has occured. That seems like a nice solution, but what about these problems? :

  1. How do you wait for multiple events at the same time, and branch depending on which one comes first? Or should the program be redesigned to avoid such situations?

  2. How to cancel the waiting after a certain period? The event loop can have timeout parameters in its socket send/receive wrappers, but what about custom events?

  3. How do you trigger the coroutine to change its state from outside? For example, I would want a function that when called, would cause the coroutine to jump to a different step, or start waiting for a different event.

EDIT:

Currently I have a system where I register a coroutine with an event, and the coroutine gets resumed with the event name and info as parameters every time the event occurs. With this system, 1 and 2 are not issues, and 3 can solved by having the coro expect a special event name that makes it jump to the different step, and resuming it with that name as an arg. Also custom objects can have methods to register event handlers the same way.

I just wonder if this is considered the right way to use coroutines for event handling. For example, if I have a read event and a timer event (as a timeout for the read), and the read event happens first, I have to manually cancel the timer. It just doesn't seem to fit the sequential nature or handling events with coroutines.

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"I just wonder if this is considered the right way to use coroutines for event handling." If it works for you, then it's the right way. And why would you use a timer event to time-out another event? Wouldn't it make more sense to simply have timing-out built into your event system? –  Nicol Bolas Jul 24 '12 at 18:57
    
"If it works for you, then it's the right way" It works alright (but not really great), and i was thinking that there might be a way that's much nicer, but I'm missing it because I'm not extremely familair with coroutines. "And why would you use a timer event to time-out another event?". I can but then custom event sources will all have to implement timeouts. Maybe I can fix that by adding a system to register custom event sources with the main event loop? And finally, maybe I should make handlers be automatically removed on the first trigger? –  mtk358 Jul 24 '12 at 19:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How do you wait for multiple events at the same time, and branch depending on which one comes first?

If you need to use coroutines for this, rather than just a Lua function that you register (for example, if you have a function that does stuff, waits for an event, then does more stuff), then this is pretty simple. coroutine.yield will return all of the values passed to coroutine.resume when the coroutine is resumed.

So just pass the event, and let the script decide for itself if that's the one it's waiting for or not. Indeed, you could build a simple function to do this:

function WaitForEvents(...)
  local events = {...}
  assert(#... ~= 0, "You must pass at least one parameter")

  do
    RegisterForAnyEvent(coroutine.running()) --Registers the coroutine with the system, so that it will be resumed when an event is fired.
    local event = coroutine.yield()
    for i, testEvt in ipairs(events) do
      if(event == testEvt) then
        return
      end
    end
  until(false)
end

This function will continue to yield until one of the events it is given has been fired. The loop assumes that RegisterForAnyEvent is temporary, registering the function for just one event, so you need to re-register every time an event is fired.

How to cancel the waiting after a certain period?

Put a counter in the above loop, and leave after a certain period of time. I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader; it all depends on how your application measures time.

How do you trigger the coroutine to change its state from outside?

You cannot magic a Lua function into a different "state". You can only call functions and have them return results. So if you want to skip around within some process, you must write your Lua function system to be able to be skippable.

How you do that is up to you. You could have each set of non-waiting commands be a separate Lua function. Or you could just design your wait states to be able to skip ahead. Or whatever.

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That's kind of the way I was doing it now, but I see that most examples (and libraries, such as Copas) use yielding wrappers for blocking functions instead of event registering functions and then manually calling yield. My question was how do I solve my problems with that type of coroutine event system, because as far as I can tell it seems more elegant and is the "proper" way (correct me if it's not). –  mtk358 Jul 24 '12 at 12:08
    
@mtk358: Then you put this code in the wrapper. This ain't rocket science. If you have something that waits for multiple events, then whatever "yielding wrappers" should have the code to wait for multiple events. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 24 '12 at 18:59
    
I know that the "yielding wrappers" can wait for only one event at a time, but I asked that maybe such situations should be avoided and written differently (but how?). The main thing that makes me wonder about this is that Copas uses "yielding wrappers", and seems to completely ignore my three issues. But it still has to be usable somehow, right? –  mtk358 Jul 24 '12 at 19:26
    
@mtk358: Does the docs for this Copas library say that you can wait for multiple events? If not, then it simply doesn't allow it (or you have to code it yourself). Also, I never said that you can't use yielding wrappers to wait for multiple events; Indeed, I said the exact opposite. You simply have your wrapper be given multiple events, exactly as shown above. Indeed, that is a yielding wrapper. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 24 '12 at 19:42

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