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I've a list of records retrieved through external web service. Some of the data are rubbish and would like to log the record that failed by throwing a new exception.

Wondering if this is best way to handle, as i read exception can impact the performance?

Pseudo code e.g. 

try
Loop through listOfRecords
  perform logic.
catch
  throw new exception (record details)
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2 Answers 2

It's not the best way, since you only need the log-writing functionality. Just write to the log and continue the loop.

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It depends on what you want to do with the rest of the records when an exception is encountered. Your current implementation would terminate the loop on the first error.

If, however, you simply want to mark the record in some way as "unprocessed" or "errored" and continue with the remaining records, you'd want to handle the error entirely within the loop:

foreach (var record in records)
{
    try
    {
        Process(record);
    }
    catch (TypedException ex)
    {
        LogError(ex);
        MarkAsUnprocessed(record, ex);
        // respond in some other way as well?
    }
}

Ultimately, the exception handling logic belongs wherever it logically makes sense to handle the exceptions. Catching exceptions is the easy part, that's a simple construct of the language being used. Meaningfully handling exceptions is another story entirely, and is a logical construct independent of the language being used.

Edit: It's also very much worth noting that your pseudo-code implies this way of handling exceptions:

try
{
    // something
}
catch
{
    throw new Exception("something");
}

This is very bad practice. Throwing an entirely new exception essentially tosses out the exception that was caught, which gets rid of some very useful debugging information (not the least of which being the stack trace). If you want to immediately log the exception and then let it continue up the stack, simply use the keyword throw by itself:

try
{
    // something
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // log the exception
    throw;
}

If you want to add context to the exception, you can modify its properties before throwing it again. Or perhaps even better, throw a custom exception (not Exception) and attach the existing one as the InnerException property:

try
{
    // something
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    throw new RecordProcessingException("some additional context", ex);
}

If, on the other hand, there's nothing meaningful to be done with the exception in the current context, don't even catch it at all. Let it bubble up the stack until it encounters code that can meaningfully handle it.

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