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I need a way to control the camera flash on an Android device while it is recording video. I'm making a strobe light app, and taking videos with a flashing strobe light would result in the ability to record objects that are moving at high speeds, like a fan blade.

The flash can only be enabled by starting a video preview and setting FLASH_MODE_TORCH in the camera's parameters. That would look like this:

Camera c = Camera.open();
Camera.Parameters p = c.getParameters();
p.setFlashState(Camera.Parameters.FLASH_STATE_TORCH);
c.setParameters(p);
c.startPreview();

Once the preview has started, I can flip that parameter back and forth to turn the light on and off. This works well until I try to record a video. The trouble is that in order to give the camera to the MediaRecorder, I first have to unlock it.

MediaRecorder m = new MediaRecorder();
c.unlock();     // the killer
m.setCamera(c);

After that unlock, I can no longer change the camera parameters and therefore have no way to change the flash state.

I do not know if it is actually possible to do this since I'm not the best at java-hacking, but here is what I do know:

  • Camera.unlock() is a native method, so I can't really see the mechanism behind the way it locks me out
  • Camera.Parameter has a HashMap that contains all of its parameters
  • Camera.setParameters(Parameters) takes the HashMap, converts it to a string, and passes it to a native method
  • I can eliminate all the parameters but TORCH-MODE from the HashMap and the Camera will still accept it

So, I can still access the Camera, but it won't listen to anything I tell it. (Which is kind of the purpose of Camera.unlock())

Edit:

After examining the native code, I can see that in CameraService.cpp my calls to Camera.setParameters(Parameters) get rejected because my Process ID does not match the Process ID the camera service has on record. So it would appear that that is my hurdle.

Edit2:

It would appear that the MediaPlayerService is the primary service that takes control of the camera when a video is recording. I do not know if it is possible, but if I could somehow start that service in my own process, I should be able to skip the Camera.unlock() call.

Edit3:

One last option would be if I could somehow get a pointer to the CameraHardwareInterface. From the looks of it, this is a device specific interface and probably does not include the PID checks. The main problem with this though is that the only place that I can find a pointer to it is in CameraService, and CameraService isn't talking.

Edit4: (several months later)

At this point, I don't think it is possible to do what I originally wanted. I don't want to delete the question on the off chance that someone does answer it, but I'm not actively seeking an answer. (Though, receiving a valid answer would be awesome.)

share|improve this question
1  
I don't really see why you would think this is possible. I would expect video recording would take complete control of the camera. It would require special coding in it to allow something else to control the camera at the same time. –  O'Rooney Oct 16 '12 at 1:08
1  
I totally agree, I don't think it's possible at this point either, I'm just leaving the question here at this point on the off chance someone does miraculously find a way. –  thepenguin77 Nov 3 '12 at 1:27

3 Answers 3

I encountered a similar issue. The user should be able to change the flash mode during recording to meet their needs depending on the light situation. After some investigative research i came to the following solution:

I assume, that you've already set up a proper SurfaceView and a SurfaceHolder with its necessary callbacks. The first thing i did was providing this code (not declared variables are globals):

public void surfaceCreated(SurfaceHolder holder) {
    try {
        camera = Camera.open();

        parameters = camera.getParameters();
        parameters.setFlashMode(Parameters.FLASH_MODE_OFF);

        camera.setParameters(parameters);
        camera.setPreviewDisplay(holder);
        camera.startPreview();

        recorder = new MediaRecorder();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }       
}

My next step was initializing and preparing the recorder:

private void initialize() {
    camera.unlock();

    recorder.setCamera(camera);
    recorder.setAudioSource(MediaRecorder.AudioSource.CAMCORDER);
    recorder.setVideoSource(MediaRecorder.VideoSource.CAMERA);
    recorder.setOutputFormat(MediaRecorder.OutputFormat.MPEG_4);
    recorder.setAudioEncoder(MediaRecorder.AudioEncoder.AAC);
    recorder.setVideoEncoder(MediaRecorder.VideoEncoder.H264);
    recorder.setVideoFrameRate(20);
    recorder.setOutputFile(filePath);

    try {
        recorder.prepare();
    } catch (IllegalStateException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        finish();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        finish();
    }
}

It's important to note, that camera.unlock() has to be called BEFORE the whole initialization process of the media recorder. That said also be aware of the proper order of each set property, otherwise you'll get an IllegalStateException when calling prepare() or start(). When it comes to recording, i do this. This will usually be triggered by a view element:

public void record(View view) {
    if (recording) {
        recorder.stop();

        //TODO: do stuff....

        recording = false;
    } else {
        recording = true;

        initialize();
        recorder.start();
    }
}

So now, i finally can record properly. But what's with that flash? Last but not least, here comes the magic behind the scenes:

public void flash(View view) {
    if(!recording) {
        camera.lock();
    }

    parameters.setFlashMode(parameters.getFlashMode().equals(Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH) ? Parameters.FLASH_MODE_OFF : Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH);
    camera.setParameters(parameters);

    if(!recording) {
        camera.unlock();
    }
}

Everytime i call that method via an onClick action i can change the flash mode, even during recording. Just take care of properly locking the camera. Once the lock is aquired by the media recorder during recording, you don't have to lock/unlock the camera again. It doesn't even work. This was tested on a Samsung Galaxy S3 with Android-Version 4.1.2. Hope this approach helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I currently don't have time to try this out. But why does this work? It appears that if you are currently recording, flash() won't lock the camera, and since it has already been unlocked, the camera.setParameters() will fail. And thanks for being the first person to actually answer the question. –  thepenguin77 Feb 14 '13 at 4:02
    
I don't have a deep insight here, but I assume that the recorder aquires an exclusive lock between the calls start() and stop(). So the access for other processes to this ressource is denied during that time, except for the ui main thread where the recording happens and since it also handles the ui action calls, this approach should work just fine. –  fje Feb 14 '13 at 21:29
    
Oh, so only the UI thread is allowed to change the flash state? –  thepenguin77 Feb 15 '13 at 2:08
    
I guess, as long as the recording thread also handles the setParameters() calls, it shouldn't matter, if it's the ui thread or any other. –  fje Feb 16 '13 at 16:38
    
@thepenguin77 I have no issues with toggling the flash light during video recording on Android 4.3.1 (Samsung Galaxy S3, i9300). As for the lock() and unlock() methods, I understand its behavior as follows: on Camera.open(), you try to take "ownership". Before you can pass the camera to a MediaRecorder, you have to unlock it again. After MediaRecorder acquired it, you cannot use it from other processes anymore unless you call unlock. When MediaRecorder is done, you can gain the ownership back using lock(). –  Lekensteyn Jun 1 at 21:34

Try this.. hopefully it will work.. :)

 private static Torch torch;

          public Torch() {
            super();
            torch = this;
          }

          public static Torch getTorch() {
            return torch;
          }

          private void getCamera() {
            if (mCamera == null) {
              try {
                mCamera = Camera.open();
              } catch (RuntimeException e) {
                Log.e(TAG, "Camera.open() failed: " + e.getMessage());
              }
            }
          }
        public void toggleLight(View view) {
            toggleLight();
          }

          private void toggleLight() {
            if (lightOn) {
              turnLightOff();
            } else {
              turnLightOn();
            }
          }

          private void turnLightOn() {
            if (!eulaAgreed) {
              return;
            }
            if (mCamera == null) {
              Toast.makeText(this, "Camera not found", Toast.LENGTH_LONG);
                   button.setBackgroundColor(COLOR_WHITE);
              return;
            }
            lightOn = true;
            Parameters parameters = mCamera.getParameters();
            if (parameters == null) {
                    button.setBackgroundColor(COLOR_WHITE);
              return;
         }
            List<String> flashModes = parameters.getSupportedFlashModes();
               if (flashModes == null) {
                   button.setBackgroundColor(COLOR_WHITE);
              return;
            }
            String flashMode = parameters.getFlashMode();
            Log.i(TAG, "Flash mode: " + flashMode);
            Log.i(TAG, "Flash modes: " + flashModes);
            if (!Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH.equals(flashMode)) {
                   if (flashModes.contains(Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH)) {
                parameters.setFlashMode(Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH);
                mCamera.setParameters(parameters);
                button.setBackgroundColor(COLOR_LIGHT);
                startWakeLock();
              } else {
                Toast.makeText(this, "Flash mode (torch) not supported",
                    Toast.LENGTH_LONG);
                       button.setBackgroundColor(COLOR_WHITE);
                Log.e(TAG, "FLASH_MODE_TORCH not supported");
              }
            }
          }
         private void turnLightOff() {
            if (lightOn) {
                    button.setBackgroundColor(COLOR_DARK);
              lightOn = false;
              if (mCamera == null) {
                return;
              }
              Parameters parameters = mCamera.getParameters();
              if (parameters == null) {
                return;
              }
              List<String> flashModes = parameters.getSupportedFlashModes();
              String flashMode = parameters.getFlashMode();
                   if (flashModes == null) {
                return;
              }
              Log.i(TAG, "Flash mode: " + flashMode);
              Log.i(TAG, "Flash modes: " + flashModes);
              if (!Parameters.FLASH_MODE_OFF.equals(flashMode)) {
                       if (flashModes.contains(Parameters.FLASH_MODE_OFF)) {
                  parameters.setFlashMode(Parameters.FLASH_MODE_OFF);
                  mCamera.setParameters(parameters);
                  stopWakeLock();
                } else {
                  Log.e(TAG, "FLASH_MODE_OFF not supported");
                }
              }
            }
          }
     private void startPreview() {
        if (!previewOn && mCamera != null) {
          mCamera.startPreview();
          previewOn = true;
        }
      }

      private void stopPreview() {
        if (previewOn && mCamera != null) {
          mCamera.stopPreview();
          previewOn = false;
        }
      }

      private void startWakeLock() {
        if (wakeLock == null) {
          Log.d(TAG, "wakeLock is null, getting a new WakeLock");
          PowerManager pm = (PowerManager) getSystemService(Context.POWER_SERVICE);
          Log.d(TAG, "PowerManager acquired");
          wakeLock = pm.newWakeLock(PowerManager.PARTIAL_WAKE_LOCK, WAKE_LOCK_TAG);
          Log.d(TAG, "WakeLock set");
        }
        wakeLock.acquire();
        Log.d(TAG, "WakeLock acquired");
      }

      private void stopWakeLock() {
        if (wakeLock != null) {
          wakeLock.release();
          Log.d(TAG, "WakeLock released");
        }
      }
     @Override
      public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        if (Eula.show(this)) {
          eulaAgreed = true;
        }
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
        button = findViewById(R.id.button);
        surfaceView = (SurfaceView) this.findViewById(R.id.surfaceview);
        surfaceHolder = surfaceView.getHolder();
        surfaceHolder.addCallback(this);
        surfaceHolder.setType(SurfaceHolder.SURFACE_TYPE_PUSH_BUFFERS);
        disablePhoneSleep();
        Log.i(TAG, "onCreate");
      }
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so first of all, this doesn't answer my question at all and and has a lot of useless information. Secondly, it's a direct copy/paste from here: torch.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/src/com/colinmcdonough/android/… –  thepenguin77 Dec 16 '12 at 22:48

To access the device camera, you must declare the CAMERA permission in your Android Manifest. Also be sure to include the <uses-feature> manifest element to declare camera features used by your application. For example, if you use the camera and auto-focus feature, your Manifest should include the following:

 <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.CAMERA" />
 <uses-feature android:name="android.hardware.camera" />
 <uses-feature android:name="android.hardware.camera.autofocus" />

A sample that checks for torch support might look something like this:

//Create camera and parameter objects
private Camera mCamera;
private Camera.Parameters mParameters;
private boolean mbTorchEnabled = false;

//... later in a click handler or other location, assuming that the mCamera object has already been instantiated with Camera.open()
mParameters = mCamera.getParameters();

//Get supported flash modes
List flashModes = mParameters.getSupportedFlashModes ();

//Make sure that torch mode is supported
//EDIT - wrong and dangerous to check for torch support this way
//if(flashModes != null && flashModes.contains("torch")){
if(flashModes != null && flashModes.contains(Camera.Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH)){
    if(mbTorchEnabled){
        //Set the flash parameter to off
        mParameters.setFlashMode(Camera.Parameters.FLASH_MODE_OFF);
    }
    else{
        //Set the flash parameter to use the torch
        mParameters.setFlashMode(Camera.Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH);
    }

    //Commit the camera parameters
    mCamera.setParameters(mParameters);

    mbTorchEnabled = !mbTorchEnabled;
}

To turn the torch on, you simply set the camera parameter Camera.Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH

Camera mCamera;
Camera.Parameters mParameters;

//Get a reference to the camera/parameters
mCamera = Camera.open();
mParameters = mCamera.getParameters();

//Set the torch parameter
mParameters.setFlashMode(Camera.Parameters.FLASH_MODE_TORCH);

//Comit camera parameters
mCamera.setParameters(mParameters);

To turn the torch off, set Camera.Parameters.FLASH_MODE_OFF

share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't really help at all. I know how to turn the flash on, the trouble is toggling the flash while a video is recording. –  thepenguin77 Sep 4 '12 at 5:22

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