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I've been running through Project Euler trying to write programs that are computationally efficient. Consider problem 1: http://projecteuler.net/problem=1. I've upped the range from 1000 to 10,000,000 to highlight inefficiencies.

This is my solution:

system.time({
    x <- 1:1E7
    a <- sum(as.numeric(x[x%%3 ==0 | x%%5==0]))
})
 user  system elapsed 
0.980   0.041   1.011

Here is some C++ code written by a friend to do the same thing.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
 long x = 0;
 for (int i = 1; i < 10000000; i++)
 {
   if (i % 3 == 0)
     x += i;
   else if (i % 5 == 0)
     x += i;
 }
 cout << x;
 return 0;
}
cbaden$ time ./a.out
23333331666668
real    0m0.044s
user    0m0.042s
sys     0m0.001s

I know C++ should be faster than R, but this much faster? Rprof indicate that I'm spending almost 60% of my time with the modulo operator and 13% of the time with the "==" operation. Are there any vectorized ways of doing this faster?

A secondary concern would be that I'm going to run out of memory--this approach is not very scalable as the range gets larger. Is there a good way to do this that preserves the vectorizability, yet doesn't try to keep the subset in memory?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A faster solution

x <-1E7
a<-x%/%3
b<-x%/%5
c<-x%/%15
ans<-3*a*(a+1)/2+5*b*(b+1)/2-15*c*(c+1)/2

doesnt really help with regards to the modulo

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's pretty crazy! I can't really understand what it's doing. The n(n+1)/2 would be the sum from 1 to n, but I suppose I don't understand why this works. –  Christopher Aden Jul 24 '12 at 5:46
    
It mightn't help with the modulo, but is a wonderfully elegant solution! –  mnel Jul 24 '12 at 6:02
    
a is the number of values divisible by 3, and suppose we make a series (1, 2, 3, ..., a). Multiply this by 3 to get (3, 6, 9, ..., 1E9), the numbers divisible by 3. Using that shortcut formula sum_{i=1}^a i = a(a+1) / 2 only requires us to have know a, instead of the whole array. To sum all the those divisible by 3 instead of the vector 1, ... , a, multiply the whole thing by 3. Same logic for 5 and 15, but we subtract the 15-divisible vector to avoid double-counting. Runs almost instantly on my computer, even for very large ranges. Beautiful. –  Christopher Aden Jul 24 '12 at 6:17

Modulo is faster when it operates on integers and not numerics:

f1 <- function() {
   x <- 1:1E7
   a <- sum(as.numeric(x[x%%3 ==0 | x%%5==0]))
}

f2 <- function() {
   x <- 1:1E7
   a <- sum(as.numeric(x[x %% 3L == 0L | x %% 5L == 0L]))
}

library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(f1(), f2(), replications = 5)
#   test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
# 1 f1()            5   14.78 4.976431     13.95     0.67         NA        NA
# 2 f2()            5    2.97 1.000000      2.37     0.50         NA        NA

That's still far from C++ performance, but it's a step in the right direction.

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A slight improvement [on the OP]

system.time({
  x_3 <- seq(3, 1E7, by = 3)
  x_5 <- seq(5, 1E7, by = 5)
  x_3_5 <- unique(c(x_3, x_5))
  a <- sum(as.numeric(x_3_5))}
 )
##  user  system elapsed 
##  1.53    0.13    1.66

EDIT Having used profr to profile the code and replaced seq and unique with the internal generics / default methods.

new2 <-  function(){
  x_3 <- seq.int(3, 1E7, by = 3)
  x_5 <- seq.int(5, 1E7, by = 5)
  x_3_5 <- unique.default(c(x_3, x_5))
  a <- sum(as.numeric(x_3_5))
  }

system.time(new2())
##   user  system elapsed 
##   1.11    0.04    1.16 

For comparison (my slow machine):

system.time({
    x <- 1:1E7
    a <- sum(as.numeric(x[x %% 3 == 0 | x %% 5 == 0]))
})

## user  system elapsed 
## 4.47    0.18    4.64

Benchmarking

orig <- function(){
  x <- 1:1E7
  a <- sum(as.numeric(x[x %% 3 == 0 | x %% 5 == 0]))
}

new <-  function(){
  x_3 <- seq(3, 1E7, by = 3)
  x_5 <- seq(5,1 E7, by = 5)
  x_3_5 <- unique(c(x_3, x_5))
  a <- sum(as.numeric(x_3_5))
}

benchmark(orig(), new(), new2(), replications = 5)
##     test replications elapsed relative 
## 2  new()            5    7.67 1.198438      
## 3 new2()            5    6.40 1.000000     
## 1 orig()            5   22.01 3.439063   
share|improve this answer
    
I like your idea of using seq.int. And I like that you incremented by 3 or 5. It completely avoids the need to use the modulo at all. –  Christopher Aden Jul 24 '12 at 5:47

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