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I'm trying to do simple bit operations on a 'char' variable; I would like to define 5 constants.

const int a = 0;
const int b = 1;
const int c = 2;
const int d = 3;
const int e = 4;

When I try to set more than one bit of the char, all bits apparently up to the set bit a read as set...here is code I use to set and read bits of the char var:

char var = 0;
var |= c;
var|= d;

BOOL set = false;
if(var & b)
set = true; // reads true
if(var & c)
set = true; // also reads true
if(var & d)
set = true; // also reads true

I read an incomplete thread that says that the operation to set bits may be different for x86...the system I'm using...is that the case here?

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a, b, c, d, e should be 1 << 0, 1 << 1, 1 << 2, etc. –  nhahtdh Jul 24 '12 at 4:09
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're cutting into your other "bits"' space. Examining a couple gives us:

b = 1 = 0001
c = 2 = 0010
d = 3 = 0011 //uh oh, it's b and c put together (ORed)

To get around this, make each one represent a new bit position:

const int a = 0; //or 0x0
const int b = 1; //or 0x1 
const int c = 2; //or 0x2 or 1 << 1
const int d = 4; //or 0x4 or 1 << 2
const int e = 8; //or 0x8 or 1 << 3

You should consider not using 0 if there's a possibility of no bits being set meaning something different, too. The main application for this is to set and check flags, and no flags set definitely shows independence.

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One thing I like to do when using bit field values is to write them with bit shift operator to make it obvious, ex: b = 1 << 0; c = 1 << 1; d = 1 << 2; Or I write them in binary form to be more visual. –  PRouleau Jul 24 '12 at 4:11
    
@PRouleau, Yes, that's common and I added it to the comments. –  chris Jul 24 '12 at 4:13
    
Nice update you done there ;) –  PRouleau Jul 24 '12 at 4:15
    
that works thanks...why though can't I set the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 without adding the values together? –  P. Avery Jul 24 '12 at 4:28
    
@P.Avery, Let's say you do that and set 3. Well, the binary representation of 3 is 1 OR 2. Thus, setting 3 is the same thing as setting 1 and setting 2. Now we don't want that. We want setting one to be independent of others. That's why each one needs its own bit. With powers of two, the binary representations don't collide at all, so you can set as many of them as you want without changing the state of others. –  chris Jul 24 '12 at 4:34
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Change your definitions to because they way you have defined it some of them has more than one bit set

const int a = 1 << 0;
const int b = 1 << 1;
const int c = 1 << 2;
const int d = 1 << 3;
const int e = 1 << 4;

This way it is evident that each constant only has 1 bit set.

If you want to learn all about the various bit hacks...

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