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As I am writing tests in Cucumber and Ruby on Rails, I keep asking myself this question. When do I test "how do I create X" vs "can X be created"

How do I create X seems to encompass testing the actual steps it takes for a user to create X, commonly through a form. Such as navigate to the new page, click the "create X" link, fill out the form and click create and then see that X has been created.

The alternative, "can x be created", is whether the system, model and controller, handle the capacity to create X, aka are they wired up properly.

Do I usually test both of these scenarios? I just barely started writing a Question and Answer part to my side project, and couldn't decide whether to write the test something like (I have removed the backgrounds, they are kind of long)

When I click "Ask the seller a question"
And I fill out the form with a question and submit the form
Then I should see that the question has been created
And the user that posted the job has been notified

or should it be more like

When I ask the seller a question
Then I should see that the question has been posted
And the user that posted the job has been notified

The difference being whether I create it through a form or factory, correct? Where does Rspec come into play, I think it should be testing the "can X be created" and does that mean I shouldn't be using cucumber to test that?

I think i'm essentially looking at "What do I test with cucumber", but maybe i'm making this more complicated then it is but I am having trouble coming to the conclusion by myself. Any insight you have would be great.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The approach you described as "how do I create X" is better because you're taking user perspective for testing, which is imho more natural/popular for Cucumber.

Also, this approach is better from the documentation perspective -> you describe how something works and not "what's expected". So if you need an refreshment or there is a new developer on a project -> you or him can just read a scenario.

You can read a bit about user perspective testing here: http://www.businesstechnologyarticles.eu/testing-the-user-perspective-with-ruby-on-rails

I hope that helps.

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Nowadays I would answer differently. The Cucumber scenarios should be more like 'can X be created' (I mean your second example) but use only Capybara in steps with very little of Ruby code, RSpec, FactoryGirl... Since web_steps were removed from Cucumber you should not be tempted to write such steps:

When I click "Ask the seller a question"
And I fill out the form with a question and submit the form

This is a really bad approach.

The second example is much better

When I ask the seller a question
Then I should see that the question has been posted
And the user that posted the job has been notified

It is more about the general idea without going to details

but you should write mostly Capybara steps then which will have all the details about 'how do I create X'.

Example:

When(/^I ask the seller a question$/) do
  click_link 'Ask the seller a question'
  fill_in 'my_form', with: 'My question'
  click_button 'Submit'
end

Then(/^I should see that the question has been posted$/) do
  expect(page).to have_selector '.alert', text: 'New question has been posted.'
  expect(page).to have_content 'Question: My question'
end
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