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I want to build my own JVM and can't find any instructions for doing it on an operating system that is still supported... like one that still receives security updates. I've found [1] very helpful, but it advises building on Fedora 11 or other operating systems from the 2009 era. What platforms are other JVM hackers using today, and are there any instructions/blogs/best practices out there somewhere for building on newer operating systems?

[1] - http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk7u/jdk7u4/raw-file/tip/README-builds.html

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Have you tried the instructions at all on your new distro? What are the problems that you are having after following them? –  vanza Jul 26 '12 at 3:56
    
Yes, I've tried. Lots of cryptic compilation errors. I can post them when I'm at my dev box, if you think it would help to post them. –  sholsapp Jul 26 '12 at 4:05
    
Posting some of the errors in the question would help, as would searching for them on Google. I've never built the Open JDK but currently your question is too broad for anybody to be able to help. –  vanza Jul 26 '12 at 4:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could look at the package definitions of OpenJDK packages in any of the distributions, they all contain the necessary steps to compile it.

For example, to look at the Ubuntu package, go to the site of the source package, download the files at the bottom, extract them, apply the patch and look at the files in the debian subdirectory (especially in debian/rules).

For the Gentoo package, I guess the relevant ebuild is this one.

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How did you find packages.ubuntu.com/source/precise/openjdk-7.Did you use the apt-get to discover those? –  sholsapp Jul 29 '12 at 20:08
    
@sholsapp I already knew the package name and the site packages.ubuntu.com, so this was easy. In general you can use apt-cache search or a tool like aptitude or synaptic for searching packages. –  Philipp Wendler Jul 30 '12 at 5:47

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