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I am using Mockito for my unit tests. I need to mock a void method which populates some input. Very very naive Example:

class Something {
   AnotherThing thing = new AnotherThing();
   public int doSomething(Stuff stuff)
   {
      thing.doThing(stuff);
      if(thing.getName().equals("yes")){
        return 1;
      }
      else {
        return 2;
      }
   }
}

class AnotherThing() {
   public void doThing(Stuff stuff){
       if(stuff.getName().equals("Tom")) {
          stuff.setName("yes");
       }
       else {
          stuff.setName("no");
       }
   }
}

class Stuff()
{
   String name;
   // name getters and setters here
}

In this instance I would be trying to to mock AnotherThing to test Something.

However, I call this void method multiple times in the class I am testing. I need different " Answer"s every time I call it. What I mean is, I want to invoke the void method to do different things every time it is called.

I looked through the API and could not find a solution for this. Is this even possible with Mockito?

share|improve this question
    
please add some sample code – Kowser Jul 24 '12 at 5:24
    
oops, good idea – Slamice Jul 24 '12 at 5:34
    
I don't quite understand what's the meaning of "void method ... populate some input". – Adrian Shum Jul 24 '12 at 5:40
    
Your example code is still unclear: you declare doThing() as void but then you call .equals() as if it returns a value. – Daniel Pryden Jul 24 '12 at 6:09
    
Thank you daniel. I wish I could specify my exact example but it is production code. I fixed this. – Slamice Jul 24 '12 at 6:56
up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you need is a Mockito Answer object. This is an object that contains a wee bit of functionality that you can run when a method of a mock is called. Check out the Mockito documentation of doAnswer for more detail; but basically what you want is something like this.

  doAnswer(new Answer<Object>(){
        @Override
        public Object answer(InvocationOnMock invocation){
           Object[] arguments = invocation.getArguments();
           Stuff argument = (Stuff) arguments[0];
           if(stuff.getName().equals("Tom")) {
              stuff.setName("yes");
           }
           else {
              stuff.setName("no");
           }
           return null;
        }
     }).when(mockObject).doThing(any(Stuff.class));
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a solution that answers the question keeping the void return type. However, this is horribly verbose code so I'd favour refactoring the class under test if possible. – Brad Jul 31 '12 at 9:24
    
@Brad Yes, that's certainly the case. I was just trying to illustrate the answer using the original poster's original code. I kind of assumed that the original code was there for illustrative purposes, not because this was going to be in the poster's finished software. – David Wallace Jul 31 '12 at 9:27
    
+1 cause it solves the issue, though I was hoping for a more elegant way like when the method is not void, since usage of answer is discouraged by mockito's documentation – fd8s0 Apr 24 '13 at 15:21
1  
Can you clarify what you mean by "usage of answer is discouraged by mockito's documentation" please? The Mockito team have put a lot of effort into Answers and related functionality. I'm not sure why they would then go and discourage the use of that functionality. – David Wallace Apr 25 '13 at 2:08

Mockito give you a possibility to stub a consecutive calls. I think this is what you need. Here is a link to necessary part in mockito documentation.

You can write like this:

Mockito.when(mockAnotherThing.doThing(stuff)).thenReturn("yes").thenReturn("no");

After this mockito during first invocetion will return "yes" and during second - "no".

And by the way, I think you need to change your example code like this (in other case it will not work):

class AnotherThing() {
   public String doThing(Stuff stuff){
       if(stuff.getName().equals("Tom")) {
         return "yes";
       }
       else {
          return "no";
       }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, but my question is does it give the possibility to stub consecutive calls for void methods? – Slamice Jul 24 '12 at 6:57
    
Ok. In such case, please, clarify what do you want exactly to do (may be post better example). Because I can't understand why do you need to mock void method and what do you want to test. – dimas Jul 24 '12 at 7:06

You cannot use equals as the return type is void either change the return type of doThing() to String and then mock like this

 Anotherthing anotherthing = mock(Anotherthing.class)
 when(anotherThing.doThing(isA(Stuff.class))).thenReturn("yes").thenReturn("no");

you might want to mock this multiple times else the last stubbed value ("no" is returned) after 2 consecutive calls;

share|improve this answer

Why do you need different Answer? You could use the same one:

doAnswer(new Answer<Object>(){
    private int call;
    @Override
    public Object answer(InvocationOnMock invocation){
        ...
        call = call + 1;
        if (call % 2 == 0) {
        //do something
        } else {
        //another behavior 
        }
    }
 }).when(mockObject).doThing(any(Stuff.class));
share|improve this answer

There is a simpler way:

doNothing().doNothing().doThrow(new RuntimeException()).when(mock).someVoidMethod();

In this way, multiple calls to the method can do different things.

share|improve this answer

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