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Consider the following;

class Mobile
{
}
class Android extends Mobile
{
}
class Iphone extends Mobile
{
}

Now I have to create a list that accepts "ONLY" the child class objects and not the super class (Mobile) object.

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4  
May I ask why you would want to do this? Seems like a weird usage of polymorphism. –  pcalcao Jul 24 '12 at 10:23
    
faced this qn for an interview... –  zDroid Jul 24 '12 at 10:27

3 Answers 3

Override add() and addAll() method to check for the object.getClass().getSimpleName()

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Although it would work, there's probably another way to achieve the OP's goal without that... –  assylias Jul 24 '12 at 10:24
1  
@assy Absolutely, depends on user's requirement –  Jigar Joshi Jul 24 '12 at 10:25

In short, no.

In long, that's not reasonable. First you have to know that what you added is a "reference". A reference to Mobile can point to an instance of Mobile, Iphone or Android. Do you want to restrict by the actual type of instance, or you want to restrict by type of reference?

restrict by the actual type of instance:

Mobile a = new Mobile();
Mobile b = new Iphone();
Mobile c = new Android();

aList.add(a);  //reject
aList.add(b);  //allow
aList.add(c);  //allow

restrict by type of reference:

Mobile a = ...;
Iphone b = ...;
Android c = ...;

aList.add(a);  //reject
aList.add(b);  //allow
aList.add(c);  //allow

For the first case you still can extend the list and do the checking inside some of the methods (of course, type checking happens in runtime, not compile time)

For the second case, I don't think you can have a reasonable way to achieve

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1  
how did u declared aList? –  Pramod Kumar Jul 24 '12 at 10:33
    
For case 1, it is your own self-written list (please note the keywords "extend"), and it is done in runtime, that means you are not relying on generics for the compile time type checking (and you can't, because what you are passing in is the reference to Mobile, you can only do the type checking in runtime) –  Adrian Shum Jul 25 '12 at 1:29

If you are allowed to, you could add a marker interface Listable:

interface Listable {
}    
class Mobile
{
}
class Android extends Mobile implements Listable
{
}
class Iphone extends Mobile implements Listable
{
}  

And then use this to create the list:

List<Listable> list = new ArrayList<Listable>();
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That's a reasonable solution. Any acceptable solution (from an object oriented perspective) would either be implementing a common interface or extending from a common base class. –  mmey Jul 24 '12 at 10:40

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