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I'm totally new to django, coming from a PHP perspective. I want to write a real basic application with four classes: Book, Ebook, Genre and price. Each Book and Ebook should have one genre and many prizes. In a SQL-DB I'd put a field in Book and Ebook referencing to a genre table by id and a new table called something like Book_prices which is linking Books and Ebooks to prices.

table book_prices
id | type   | price
---+--------+------ 
1  |  book  | 3
2  |  book  | 3 
3  |  ebook | 1

table book/ebook
id | ... | genre_id
---+-----+---------
1  |     | 5
2  |     | 7
3  |     | 9

Basically I want to add a list of prices and ONE genre for each Ebook and Book. How can I do this using the django model? I know of model.ForeignKey() which could be applied to each Book/Ebook referencing to a genre. But what about my prices? If I add a ForeignKey() to a price it can only reference to a Book OR Ebook.

class Book:
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    pages = models.IntegerField()

class Ebook:
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    filesize = models.FloatField()

class Genre:
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    info = models.TextField()

class Price:
    currency = models.CharField(max_length=4)
    amount = models.FloatField()
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's one way. It uses inheritance to reduce duplication between classes. It uses the contenttypes framework. Also your classes need to subclass django.db.models

from django.db import models
from django.contrib.contenttypes.models import ContentType
from django.contrib.contenttypes import generic

class Genre(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    info = models.TextField()

class Price(models.Model):
    currency = models.CharField(max_length=4)
    amount = models.FloatField()
    content_type = models.ForeignKey(ContentType)
    object_id = models.PositiveIntegerField()
    book = generic.GenericForeignKey('content_type', 'object_id')

class BookBase(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100) 
    genre = models.ForeignKey(Genre)

    class Meta:
        abstract = True

class Book(BookBase):
    pages = models.IntegerField()

class Ebook(models.Model):
    filesize = models.FloatField()
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If you will use south for migrations you may have some problems. stackoverflow.com/questions/1600129/… –  nk9 Jul 24 '12 at 11:58
1  
@b1- that's a really excellent SO post. thanks. –  scytale Jul 24 '12 at 12:00
    
@scytale I like the idea of subclassing, but how can I display the price fields in my admin interface? Adding a PriceInline Class to my BookAdmin/EbookAdmin leads to ".. has no ForeignKey to .." exception. –  Joey Jul 24 '12 at 21:53
class Genre:
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    info = models.TextField()

class Price:
    currency = models.CharField(max_length=4)
    amount = models.FloatField()

class Book:
    genre = models.ForeignKey(Genre)
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    pages = models.IntegerField()
    prices = models.ManyToManyField(Price)

class Ebook:
    genre = models.ForeignKey(Genre)
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    filesize = models.FloatField()
    prices = models.ManyToManyField(Price)

Get all prices for a Book instance.

b1 = Book.objects.get(id=1)
prices = b1.prices.all()

ManyToManyField creates an intermediate table behind the scenes, exactly like you would have done, if you did it manually. You can even define explicitly this table, in case you want to add more fields to it, with the through parameter

Also consider using DecimalField for prices.

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1  
The problem with this approach is that the relationship with price is not quite right. You want one book to have many prices. You don't want one price to have many books (what happens when you want to change the price of just one book?). You can get round this by adding custom validation to ensure that a price only ever relates to one book. I think a better solution tho is to implement a one-to-many Price->Book/Ebook relationship using contenttypes. –  scytale Jul 24 '12 at 11:27
    
@scytale I wouldn't model my database that way either. But that is what the OP asked and that is what I showed him. Also avoid polymorphic relationships(with ContentTypes) in large datasets, because it is very costly, in my experience at least. –  rantanplan Jul 24 '12 at 11:30
    
@rantanplan How'd you model this database? –  Joey Jul 24 '12 at 14:52
    
@Joey At first glance I would merge Book and EBook table into a single Book table. This is the obvious thing to do unless there are other constraints I don't see with your model sample. –  rantanplan Jul 24 '12 at 15:14
    
@rantanplan Yeah, this is obvious. I just wanted to figure out how to connect models the right way but could'nt find a realistic example. –  Joey Jul 24 '12 at 19:33

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