Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This code will be part of a program that will check if a number is prime or not. I know it's not particularly elegant, but I want to get it working simply for experience. I think that the function is failing because the logic on the if/elif is wrong, when I run this code, it seems to just go straight to the else clause. Is this a syntax problem, or am I not allowed to do logic checks in if clauses?

list = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47]

def find_prime(list, n):
    if n in list == False:
        list.append(n)
        print "I'ts in there now."
    elif n in list == True:
        print "It's in there already."
    else:
        print "Error"

find_prime(list, 3)
find_prime(list, 51)
share|improve this question
    
You should not name a variable list Python is already using that identifier. – Levon Jul 24 '12 at 11:09
1  
Instead of commenting on all the answers, I'll just say thanks here, because all of them worked :) – cjm Jul 24 '12 at 11:18
    
accept one answer atleast.... – NIlesh Sharma Jul 24 '12 at 11:21
    
This explains your current problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/9284350/… – jamylak Jul 24 '12 at 11:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. list is a bad name for a variable. It masks the built-in list.

  2. if n in list == True: doesn't do what you await: 1 in [0, 1] == True returns False (because, as @Duncan notes, 1 in [0,1] == True is shorthand for 1 in [0,1] and [0,1] == True). Use if n in li: and if n not in li:

  3. No reason for an Error, since an element is in the list or it is not in the list. Anything else is programming error.

So your code could look like this:

li = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47]

def find_prime(li, n):
    if n in li:
        print "It's in there already."
    else:
        li.append(n)
        print "It's in there now."
share|improve this answer
1  
Part 2 of your answer is slightly wrong. If it was attempting to test 1 in False you would get an exception. What actually happens is that 1 in [0,1] == True is shorthand for 1 in [0,1] and [0,1] == True and the part after the and is False. – Duncan Jul 24 '12 at 13:13
    
@Duncan - thank you for pointing that out. I have updated the answer. – eumiro Jul 24 '12 at 13:23

Don't call your list list. Call it mylist or something else.

Use if not n in mylist and if n in mylist.

share|improve this answer

Since the value is either going to be in the list or not, I don't think you need to check three options in your if/else logic.

list = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47]

def find_prime(list, n):
   if n in list:
      print "It's in there already."
   else:
      list.append(n)
      print "It's in there now."

find_prime(list,3)
find_prime(list,53)
share|improve this answer

Try this code instead of testing for True/False. Also see my comment above regarding using list as a variable name (bad idea since that identifier is used by Python).

mylist = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47]

def find_prime(mylist, n):
    if not n in mylist:
        mylist.append(n)
        print "I'ts in there now."
    else: # n in mylist:  has to be the case
        print "It's in there already."

You don't need the original last else, your choice is binary, either the number will be in the list or it won't.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.