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I have seen several posts about production cache management but I'm trying to get the proper way.

I have seen some pretty sudo chmod 777 app/cache app/log and even sudo chmod 777 ../my_project_root :)

I don't want to use the chmod technique. I think it's better to chown www-data cache and log folders.

Now the question is:
When I need to clear the cache in my production server it's told to use:

$ sudo php app/console cache:clear --env=prod

But it seems to chown the prod cache folder back to root.

How should I properly clear the cache of my production server ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
sudo -u www-data php app/console cache:clear --env=prod
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First time I see that. It seems simple and straight forward. Thank you. I will accept in 10 minutes :) –  Pierre de LESPINAY Jul 24 '12 at 11:15
2  
Probably because you think that su means "superuser"? ;) A common mistake. su means "substitute user" and with -u you give it the username of the user you want to use as substitute for yourself. sudo is like su, but for a single command. –  KingCrunch Jul 24 '12 at 11:29

If you take a look at the Symfony documentation, there are a few commands you can launch to manage cache and log directories:

sudo setfacl -R -m u:www-data:rwx -m u:`whoami`:rwx app/cache app/logs
sudo setfacl -dR -m u:www-data:rwx -m u:`whoami`:rwx app/cache app/logs

In my opinion this is the cleanest method.

NB: If you choose this method, don't forget to activate ACLs on your partition

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This allows me to do php app/console cache:clear --env=prod getting rid of the sudo isn't it ? –  Pierre de LESPINAY Jul 25 '12 at 10:14
    
Yes, this way you don't need to sudo –  Geoffrey Brier Jul 25 '12 at 10:30
    
Ok thank you, that's what I though. I am personally not able to use ACLs because I don't have rights to change fstab. But this seems indeed to be the best way. –  Pierre de LESPINAY Jul 25 '12 at 12:08

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