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There is a WCF sample named LocalChannel provided by Microsoft to show how a custom binding can be implemented to bypass unnecessary overhead when calling a service in the same ApplicationDomain. It the sample description it is stated that:

This is useful for scenarios where the client and the service are running in the same application domain and the overhead of the typical WCF channel stack (serialization and deserialization of messages) must be avoided.

I have used this code in my project, but despite the claim it seems that serialization takes place when a service is being called.

To make it more clear I have changed the code into the following to use a data contract, so it can be easily determined if serialization is being performed or not.

# region Service Contract

[ServiceContract]
public interface IGetPrice
{
    [OperationContract]
    ProductDTO GetPriceForProduct(int productCode);
}


[DataContract]
public class ProductDTO
{
    private string _price;

    public ProductDTO(string price)
    {
        _price = price;
    }

    #region Overrides of Object

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("Price = '{0}'", _price);
    }

    #endregion

    [DataMember]
    public string Price
    {
        get { return _price; }
        set { _price = value; }
    }
}

public class GetPrice : IGetPrice
{
    #region IGetPrice Members

    public ProductDTO GetPriceForProduct(int productId)
    {
        return new ProductDTO((String.Format("The price of product Id {0} is ${1}.",
                                             productId, new Random().Next(50, 100))));
    }

    #endregion
}

# endregion



internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var baseAddress = "net.local://localhost:8080/GetPriceService";

        // Start the service host
        var host = new ServiceHost(typeof (GetPrice), new Uri(baseAddress));
        host.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof (IGetPrice), new LocalBinding(), "");
        host.Open();
        Console.WriteLine("In-process service is now running...\n");

        // Start the client
        var channelFactory
            = new ChannelFactory<IGetPrice>(new LocalBinding(), baseAddress);
        var proxy = channelFactory.CreateChannel();

        // Calling in-process service
        var priceForProduct = proxy.GetPriceForProduct(101);
        Console.WriteLine("Calling in-process service to get the price of product Id {0}: \n\t {1}"
                          , 101, priceForProduct);
        Console.WriteLine("Calling in-process service to get the price of product Id {0}: \n\t {1}"
                          , 202, proxy.GetPriceForProduct(202));
        Console.WriteLine("Calling in-process service to get the price of product Id {0}: \n\t {1}"
                          , 303, proxy.GetPriceForProduct(303));

        Console.WriteLine("\nPress <ENTER> to terminate...");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Running this code indicates that 'Price' property of 'ProductDTO' class is being serialized and deserialized during calls via localbinding!

Has anyone used this method before or know if something is wrong?

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1 Answer 1

By adding callbacks, I can confirm that indeed serialization/deserialization is definitely happening:

[OnSerializing]
internal void OnSerializing(StreamingContext context) {
    Console.WriteLine("OnSerializing");
}
[OnSerialized]
internal void OnSerialized(StreamingContext context) {
    Console.WriteLine("OnSerialized");
}
[OnDeserializing]
internal void OnDeserializing(StreamingContext context) {
    Console.WriteLine("OnDeserializing");
}
[OnDeserialized]
internal void OnDeserialized(StreamingContext context) {
    Console.WriteLine("OnDeserialized");
}

This suggests to me one of several possibilities:

  • they are intending to preserve the copy-semantic that you would normally see in WCF, with client and server looking at different copies
  • it simply doesn't work
  • the documentation is wrong

Given that the statement here says:

This is useful for scenarios where the client and the service are running in the same application domain and the overhead of the typical WCF channel stack (serialization and deserialization of messages) must be avoided.

I rather suspect the middle one, i.e. whoever wrote the sample assumed it was working, without actually checking whether serialization was happening.

However! It could also be that it was intended to cut out some parts of the stack (mainly, the IO stack), but whoever wrote the documentation page misunderstood, and incorrectly stated that serialization was omitted too.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your quick response –  Gholamreza Jul 24 '12 at 12:05

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