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I'd like to run a local NuGet Gallery to serve dependencies to my build system.

I notice in the web.config it asks for Azure details, but the code seems to suggest you can choose 'FileSystem' as a storage backend.

My questions are:

  1. If I choose 'FileSystem' how do I configure the target folder?
  2. Can I instead point the storage engine at an in-house instance of SQL Server?

I'm trying to avoid using a file system because that's what we are using now with NuGet Server and it's very slow. A couple of the devs like to pack and push every single successful build, so scalability is important.

I hope any answers here will help others, too. For background, here is a great link of setting up your own NuGet Gallery. Sadly, the author has omitted all details pertaining to the actual package storage: https://github.com/NuGet/NuGetGallery/wiki/Hosting-the-NuGet-Gallery-Locally-in-IIS

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To configure File System Package Store:

<appSettings>
  <add key="Gallery:PackageStoreType" value="FileSystem" />
  <add key="Gallery:FileStorageDirectory" value="C:\Path\To\Packages" />
</appSettings>

To point to a different SQL Server:

<connectionStrings>
  <add name="NuGetGallery" connectionString="Data Source=SQLSERVERNAME;Initial Catalog=NuGetGallery;Integrated Security=SSPI" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
</connectionStrings>

EDIT: Support SQL Server as Package Store

If you want to store your packages as BLOBs in SQL Server, you'll have to make a couple of changes to the code.

First, create a class named SqlServerFileStorageService and implement IFileStorageService. This interface has several methods. The important ones are GetFile() and SaveFile(). Combining folderName and fileName will create a unique key you can use in your database table.

You can use the same connection string NuGetGallery or add a new one for your data access.

You then add an item to the enum PackageStoreType called SqlServer.

In ContainerBinding.cs add a case for PackageStoreType.SqlServer to bind to your SqlServerFileStorageService.

Now the NuGet Gallery should create a SqlServerFileStorageService and all gets and saves will use your class to store the blob in SQL Server.

BTW: I'm basing this on a cursory look at the code. There may be an extra step or two, but these look like the main areas you'll need to focus on.

Hope that helps.

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Thanks! Answer 1 is great, though I messed up with #2 by not being specific. I meant: 'can I store the packages themselves in my own SQL instance rather than necessitating an Azure account?'. I know it's frowned upon to store files in SQL but if, for whatever reason, it's better performing to do so I probably would. –  Robin Jul 24 '12 at 15:27
    
I added instructions on how to do this. You'll need to edit the Gallery code. –  Kiliman Jul 24 '12 at 17:52
    
this doesn't look like a massive amount of work - thanks for the suggestion. I'll bash it out at some point and perf test it against the FileSystem storage. –  Robin Jul 25 '12 at 13:30

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