Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to bash scripts:

script1.sh

HELLO=hello
export HELLO
./script2.sh
echo $HELLO

script2.sh

echo $HELLO
HELLO=world
export $HELLO

The output is hello hello instead of hello world. How can I modify variables between scripts which call each other?

EDIT: Passing variables as arguments won't work. I don't know the number of variables which might be changed in script2.sh.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you do not want to run the second script as a child process, you have to source it:

HELLO=hello
export HELLO
. ./script2.sh  # Note the dot at the beginning
echo $HELLO

No export is needed in the second script - you already told bash to export the variable.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Exported variables are available in subshells (as is the case with script2.sh vs script1.sh), but not to parent shells.

For this reason, the variable set by script1.sh is available in script2.sh, but setting it in script2.sh will not make it available in script1.sh when script2.sh returns.

If you will to pass the variable back to the caller, you'd need to echo it, and grab the output of script2.sh. But then, you'll need script2.sh to write to stderr if you want to see its output:

script1.sh:

HELLO=hello
export HELLO
HELLO=$(./script2.sh)
echo >&2 $HELLO

script2.sh:

echo $HELLO >&2
HELLO=world
echo $HELLO
share|improve this answer
add comment

When u call new script by ./script2.sh it forks new shell and new shell will be closed when script2 completes execution. When control comes back to script its still old shell so variable exported in script2 wont be available. To run script2 in same shell u have run it like ". ./script2.sh"

HELLO=hello
export HELLO
. ./script2.sh
echo $HELLO
share|improve this answer
add comment

The environment of script1.sh contains HELLO=hello. Nothing you do in the child script2.sh will change that.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.