Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm calling ParentObject.doSomething() which inturn calls the WebService object to perform some ajax calls, and on success of the ajax call, the callback function is executed. But any parent function inside the callback function fails.

I think this has something to do with scope resolution. I am not able to find a workaround for this problem.

Is there a better architectural style to modularize the ajax services and model?

I've create a jsfiddle also - http://jsfiddle.net/bzKXr/2/

var ParentObject =  {

     doSomething: function(){
         document.write("Inside doSomething <br />");
         var self = this;
         WebServices.firstService("some URL", self.successCallback);
     },

     changeData: function(data){
         //Manipulate data
         document.write("Inside changeData <br />");
     },

     successCallback: function(jsonData){
         document.write("Inside successCallback <br />");
         try {
             //Execution fails at this point. Possibly because of scope resolution
             this.changeData(jsonData);  
         }
         catch (error) {
             console.log(error);
             document.write(error);
         }  
     },
};

var WebServices = {
    firstService: function(url, successCallbackHandler){
        document.write("Inside firstService <br />");
        //Get data using the URL
        //on success call successCallback
        successCallbackHandler("some data");
    }
};


$(document).ready(function() {
    ParentObject.doSomething();

});
​
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Writing self.successCallback doesn't bind the function to self, you have to actually call the function as self.successCallback() to bind the context correctly.

You can do that easily by wrapping the call in a closure which retains access to self:

doSomething: function(){
     document.write("Inside doSomething <br />");
     var self = this;
     WebServices.firstService("some URL", function() {
        self.successCallback();
     });
 },

or in ES5 you can use .bind() which ensures that the this context for successCallback is always the specified parameter:

doSomething: function(){
     document.write("Inside doSomething <br />");
     WebServices.firstService("some URL", this.successCallback.bind(this));
 },
share|improve this answer

Here is the prettiest way to do it:

WebServices.firstService("some URL", this.successCallback.bind( this ));

However, it's not cross-browser. (read: IE8 and below can't use it)

This is why jQuery has $.proxy:

WebServices.firstService("some URL", $.proxy( this.successCallback, this ));
share|improve this answer

Another possiblitity is change

WebServices.firstService("some URL", self.successCallback);

to

WebServices.firstService("some URL", function(data){ return self.successCallback(data) });

The basic problem is that, unlike Python, methods Javascript in Javascript forget about their owner object as soon as you pass them somewhere else or set another variable.

share|improve this answer

if you change this.changeData(jsonData); to ParentObject.changeData(jsonData); it should work.

The reason for the error is that the this variable no longer refers to ParentObject when the AJAX call returns.

An alternative approach is to store a reference to this inside another variable (by convention called that) and change your code to say that.changeData(jsonData);

share|improve this answer
    
an object should never need to reference its own name... This code will fail if there's more than one instance of this class. –  Alnitak Jul 24 '12 at 12:27
    
@Alnitak - there are no classes in JavaScript, only objects. In the code above there is a single object called ParentObject, so I don't see an issue. –  codebox Jul 24 '12 at 12:32
    
class/function, whatever. My point is that you're tying together the internals of the function with whatever name that function happens to have externally. This is poor design, and unnecessary. –  Alnitak Jul 24 '12 at 12:35
    
If the OPs code was written differently (eg if the successCallback was defined outside ParentOject, and assigned as a method to multiple different objects) then I agree that would be a valid concern. –  codebox Jul 24 '12 at 12:42
1  
var o = Object.create(ParentObject) –  Alnitak Jul 24 '12 at 13:18

When the callback function is called, the this is not valid. In javascript, if a function is called with foo.bar(), this will be set to foo, but if you just call foo(), the previously set this will be kept, in your case the element of the event, probably your WebService. To avoid this, you must use closures. You can replace this.changeData(jsonData); by ParentObject.changeData(jsonData);. Closures means than a function can access variable in the scope where the function was defined, so your function can access ParenObject.

A more elegant way could be:

var ParentObject =  {

    doSomething: function(){
        document.write("Inside doSomething <br />");
        var self = this;
        WebServices.firstService("some URL", function(jsonData) {
            document.write("Inside successCallback <br />");
            self.changeData(jsonData);
        }
    },

    changeData: function(data){
        //Manipulate data
        document.write("Inside changeData <br />");
    }
};

You callback function is defined directly in you doSomething function, so you have access to the variable self defined in it, and can call self.changeData().

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.