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Sorry if this question's been asked before, but I can't seem to find an applicable answer!

I have this sort of matrix in Matlab:

1  0.2   0.3    1  5
1  0.25  0.36   1  6
1  0.3   0.3   -1  5
2  0.1   0.3    1  5
2  0.3   0.3   -1  5
2  0.6   0.4   -1  9 ......

The matrix is actually much longer and goes on to a value of 346 in the first column.

How can I split the matrix up into smaller matrices according to a specific order of the values in the first column? For example, I need the matrix of all the values where the first column = 160, 130, 256, 2 in that order?

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To attract more answers, you should add a tag corresponding to the language or tools you are using. You can do that by editing your question and adding tags at the bottom of the edit page. –  assylias Jul 24 '12 at 12:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To do this with grep:

grep -E '^(160|130|256|2)[ \t]'

Update

In matlab you could use the comparison operator, e.g. if data is the matrix:

 data(data(:, 1) == 1, :)

Will return the sub-matrix where the first column value is one. To apply it to your example something like this would do:

subm = [];
for i=[160, 130, 256, 2]
   subm = [subm; data(data(:, 1) == i, :);
end
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sorry i forgot to say it was in matlab –  aiuto Jul 24 '12 at 13:04
    
Amended the answer with a matlab version –  Thor Jul 24 '12 at 13:15
    
oh even better thanks!!! –  aiuto Jul 24 '12 at 13:50

Say M is your MatLab matrix. Then find(M(:,1) == 7) gives you the indices of those rows you are looking for. Also, you may do something like M(M(:,1) == 7,:) to access the corresponding submatrix

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perfect thanks for the quick reply! –  aiuto Jul 24 '12 at 13:19

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