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When I use the following query without LIMIT nested in a subquery

SELECT   `c`.*, 
         GROUP_CONCAT(g.photo SEPARATOR "|") AS `photos_list` 
  FROM   `contests` AS `c` 
              LEFT JOIN 
                  (
                      SELECT   `gallery`.`contest_id`, 
                               `gallery`.`photo` 
                        FROM   `gallery`
                   ) AS `g` ON c.id = g.contest_id 
GROUP BY `c`.`id`

all works fine

id   title    photos_list 

1    title1   50026c35632eb.jpg
2    title2   50026ac53567f.jpg|50026ac5ec82e.jpg|500e71557270f....

Bun when I add LIMIT, I get "photos_list" in only one row. Following query

SELECT   `c`.*, 
         GROUP_CONCAT(g.photo SEPARATOR "|") AS `photos_list` 
  FROM   `contests` AS `c` 
              LEFT JOIN 
                  (
                      SELECT   `gallery`.`contest_id`, 
                               `gallery`.`photo` 
                        FROM   `gallery`
                       LIMIT    0, 2
                   ) AS `g` ON c.id = g.contest_id 
GROUP BY `c`.`id`

will return

id  title   photos_list 

1   title1  NULL
2   title2  50026ac46ea05.jpg|50026ac53567f.jpg

Item with an id = 1 has to contain photos_list, but it doesn't. Noteworthy that LIMIT does work for item with an id = 2.

What should I do to get a correct result?

share|improve this question
1  
so you're trying to limit the number of photos concatenated in photos_list to 2? –  dnagirl Jul 24 '12 at 12:45
2  
LIMIT applies to the entire query. You're only taking two total rows from gallery with your query, which both happen to be associated with id=2. –  mellamokb Jul 24 '12 at 12:45
    
@dnagirl, yes, I'm trying to limit photos. –  Djeman Jul 24 '12 at 12:52
    
@mellamokb thank you! But maybe are there possible ways to apply limit to subquery? –  Djeman Jul 24 '12 at 12:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT   `c`.*, 
     GROUP_CONCAT(g.photo SEPARATOR "|") AS `photos_list` 
FROM   `contests` AS `c` 
          LEFT JOIN 
              (
                  SELECT   `gallery`.`contest_id`, 
                           `gallery`.`photo` 
                    FROM   `gallery`
               ) AS `g` ON c.id = g.contest_id 
GROUP BY `c`.`id`

Change GROUP_CONCAT to this:

SUBSTRING_INDEX(GROUP_CONCAT(g.photo SEPARATOR "|"),'|',2) AS `photos_list` 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'v already thought about this way. But how about perfomance? If there would be long strings? But seems this is the only one working solution. –  Djeman Jul 24 '12 at 13:41

You can do similar things with timestamps (e.g. AND photo_date > gsub.photo_date) or more complex criteria. The only caveat is that if there are several rows that all match the conditions (e.g. several photos have identical timestamps), all of them will be included. That's why I chose photo_id, which is assumably unique.

Insert it into your original query like so:

SELECT c.id, c.title,
       GROUP_CONCAT(g.photo SEPARATOR "|") AS photos_list
FROM   contests AS c
  LEFT JOIN (
    //put query from above here
  ) AS g 
ON c.id = g.contest_id  GROUP BY c.id
share|improve this answer

This works as well. However, without wrapping another SELECT clause around it, if there are no photos for a contest, the contest will not show up.

SELECT c.*, GROUP_CONCAT(g.photo SEPARATOR "|") AS photo_list
FROM 
  contests c 
LEFT JOIN
  (SELECT *, @num:= if(@contest = contest_id, @num + 1,1) as row_num,
             @contest := contest_id as c_id
   FROM gallery
   ORDER BY contest_id) AS g
ON c.id = g.contest_id
WHERE g.row_num <= 2
GROUP BY c.id, c.title
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! It works –  Djeman Jul 24 '12 at 14:20

SELECT c.*, ((
  SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(temp.photo SEPARATOR "|")
  FROM (SELECT photo FROM gallery g WHERE c.id = g.contest_id LIMIT 2) temp
)) AS photo_list
FROM contests c

Sorry for the incorrect answer. I'm not saying that the following solution is the optimum one but at least it works. BTW, in this new solution I've assumed that you gallery table has a primary key named id.

SELECT c.*, GROUP_CONCAT(g.photo SEPARATOR "|") AS photos_list
FROM contests AS c
LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT
        g_0.*
    FROM (
        SELECT
            g_1.*
            , ((SELECT COUNT(*) FROM gallery g_2 WHERE g_2.contest_id = g_1.contest_id AND g_2.id <= g_1.id)) AS i
        FROM gallery g_1
    ) g_0
    WHERE
        g_0.i <= 2
) g ON (c.id = g.contest_id)
GROUP BY c.id
share|improve this answer
    
The c.id in the WHERE clause can't access the contests table of the outer query. This will unfortunately not execute. –  Holger Brandt Jul 24 '12 at 14:09
    
Yes, when I try to execute it, apperas an error: #1054 - Unknown column 'c.id' in 'where clause' –  Djeman Jul 24 '12 at 14:21

How do you decide which 2 of the possible set of photos for a particular contest should be returned? Is it meant to be a random thing? Or is it the 2 most recent photos, or the 2 highest rated photos, or some other criteria? Once you can set a condition for choosing the photos, the rest is straighforward. This query would get you the 2 photos with the highest photo_ids for each contest_id:

     SELECT contest_id, photo, photo_id
       FROM gallery gsub
       WHERE (
         SELECT COUNT(*) FROM gallery 
           WHERE contest_id=gsub.contest_id //for each category
           AND photo_id > gsub.photo_id 
       ) < 2 //if number of photo_ids > than this photo_id < 2, keep this photo
       ORDER BY contest_id

You can do similar things with timestamps (e.g. AND photo_date > gsub.photo_date) or more complex criteria. The only caveat is that if there are several rows that all match the conditions (e.g. several photos have identical timestamps), all of them will be included. That's why I chose photo_id, which is assumably unique.

Insert it into your original query like so:

SELECT c.id, c.title,
           GROUP_CONCAT(g.photo SEPARATOR "|") AS photos_list
    FROM   contests AS c
      LEFT JOIN (
        //put query from above here
      ) AS g 
    ON c.id = g.contest_id  GROUP BY c.id 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for so detailed answer! –  Djeman Jul 25 '12 at 18:20

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