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I want to create a subclass, ess say, to the built-in ss class. I'd like to be able to convert an existing ss object to an ess object and at the same time add the missing properties, e.g. w, by something like this

sys=ss(a,b,c,d);
esys=ess(sys,w);

but I can't figure out how to setup the constructor correctly. What is the best way to achieve this? My code currently looks like this

classdef ess < ss
    properties
        w
    end
    methods
        function obj = ess(varargin)
            if nargin>0 && isa(varargin{1},'StateSpaceModel')
                super_args{1} = sys;
            else
                super_args = varargin;
            end
            obj = obj@ss(super_args{:});
        end
    end 
end

But this does not work as I get the following error:

 >> ess(ss(a,b,c,d))
 ??? When constructing an instance of class 'ess', the constructor must preserve
 the class of the returned object.

Of course I could copy all the object properties by hand but it seems to me that there should be some better way.

share|improve this question
    
Instead of writing that in the constructor, have a helper function that takes an ss instance and returns a new ess instance from that –  Amro Jul 24 '12 at 13:32
    
I'm not sure that comment helps me. How should I do that? Let me try to be a little clearer: I'd like to be able to take an existing ss instance and add the additional information (e.g. values for w). Is that possible without copying all the values from the original object by hand? –  sebhofer Jul 24 '12 at 13:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is an example of what I had in mind:

classdef ss < handle
    properties
        a
        b
    end

    methods
        function obj = ss(varargin)
            args = {0 0};     %# default values
            if nargin > 0, args = varargin; end
            obj.a = args{1};
            obj.b = args{2};
        end
    end
end

and:

classdef ess < ss
    properties
        c
    end

    methods
        function obj = ess(c, varargin)
            args = {};
            if nargin>1 && isa(varargin{1}, 'ss')
                args = getProps(varargin{1});
            end
            obj@ss(args{:});    %# call base-class constructor
            obj.c = c;
        end     
    end
end

%# private function that extracts object properties
function props = getProps(ssObj)
    props{1} = ssObj.a;
    props{2} = ssObj.b;
end

Lets test those classes:

x = ss(1,2);
xx = ess(3,x)

I get:

xx = 
  ess handle

  Properties:
    c: 3
    a: 1
    b: 2
  Methods, Events, Superclasses
share|improve this answer
    
If you want to make the above function getProps more generic, you could use reflection to extract the object properties without hard-coding their names. Something like: m = metaclass(ssObj); then loop over the properties to extract the values ssObj.(m.PropertyList(i).Name) –  Amro Jul 24 '12 at 14:15
    
Okay, that's what I meant by "copying properties by hand". I guess that's the way to go then. Thanks for the help! –  sebhofer Jul 24 '12 at 14:16
    
Great, thanks for the additional pointer. It should be something like x.(m.Properties{i}.Name) I guess, right? –  sebhofer Jul 24 '12 at 14:23
    
@sebhofer: here is another example that implements a copy-constructor like behavior. You should also look into matlab.mixin.Copyable, although I haven't used it before... –  Amro Jul 24 '12 at 14:24

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