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I'm working on an AJAX application. The user clicks a button and his name is saved into the database and shown inside a <div>, whose content is fetched from the database by means of an AJAX Long Polling. The database also contains a timestamp which represents an expiration: subscriptions beyond that timestamp must not be accepted. There is also a limit for users to subscribe.

I have a PHP script that is called by an AJAX request, this script queries the database and checks for expiration (the timestamp of the click is computed by JavaScript and sent via AJAX). It also checks for user limit: i have a N-to-N relationship between Users and Products (to subscribe for). These tasks obviously take time and I'm worried about possible concurrency problems. Should I use database transactions? What technique could I use to ensure the atomicity of this operation?

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Do not use Javascript for the timestamp. The user can simply change their computer's time. –  Scott S Jul 24 '12 at 13:26
    
You are right, indeed, but the timestamp in the PHP script is not equal to the time the subscription button is clicked, there is a variable system time in the middle for the AJAX request to be sent and for PHP to query the database. Same problem in requesting the current time at some ad-hoc server via AJAX. –  Dave Danuve Jul 24 '12 at 13:34
    
@DaveDanuve For the timezones PHP has this function php.net/manual/en/function.date-default-timezone-set.php –  Bondye Jul 24 '12 at 13:37
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@DaveDanuve If you mean that there is a delay between the button click and the PHP code execution, I would say that 99% of the time, it is <1second. If you want to account for that second, then do so, but I wouldn't bother. Most reasonable people won't be clicking the button with <1second to go. –  Scott S Jul 24 '12 at 13:37
    
Problem is that the presentation page has a big shiny countdown. With my luck, this will happen: 1 second left, the user clicks, gets a message "too late", the user gets angry because he'll get no promotion code, my boss fires me. –  Dave Danuve Jul 24 '12 at 14:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It depends on the kind of work that is done those "long" tasks.

Generic info:

If you're only inserting user driven data and data generated in PHP without it being read and/or cross-correlated with data fetched from the DB then transactionality should not be an issue.

If you're updating data and cross-correlating it with other elements in the DB then you need to start using transactions and to carefully choose the isolation levels of the transactions you plan on using.

Transactions can seriously affect speed when concurrency rises. Choosing a very safe isolation level may be safer than needed for your application and you may be adding a lot of unnecessary work to the MVCC.

Also using transactions as separate PHP api calls and managing the rollback logic in the application increases the overall duration of the transaction because it adds all the processing delays generated by PHP. If you can compact DB communications into a set of queries requested in one communication it would be better.

Case info:

Let's consider this scenario: there are 8 slots, 7 users subscribed. Two users click the subscribe button almost simultaneously. When the control script is launched for the last clicking user, the query for the subscription of the first clicking user might still be executed. This would imply that the system accepts both users as valid subscriptions.

This falls into the second case I explained, the case when you're cross-correlating user driven data with what you have in the DB. You're reading the state of the db before you commit the user drive data, so yes you would need transactions in this case.

There may be a possibility to speculate the inherent atomicity of one update statement. Any UPDATE table_name SET x = x+1 WHERE a = 'value'; is guaranteed to be atomic. You can use this to your advantage.

All subscribing PHP threads must first decrement a subscriber count. If the number of affected rows on the decrement is not 0 that means that the decrement was successful and they can carry on submitting the user-related data, else inform the user he was 0.3ms too slow.

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Let's consider this scenario: there are 8 slots, 7 users subscribed. Two users click the subscribe button almost simultaneously. When the control script is launched for the last clicking user, the query for the subscription of the first clicking user might still be executed. This would imply that the system accepts both users as valid subscriptions. –  Dave Danuve Jul 24 '12 at 13:53
1  
This falls into the second case I explained, the case when you're cross-correlating user driven data with what you have in the DB. You're reading the state of the db before you commit the user drive data, so yes you would need transactions in this case. There may be a possibility to speculate the inherent atomicity of one update statement. –  Mihai Stancu Jul 24 '12 at 13:58
    
Crystal clear. Thanks. (Nice joke also). –  Dave Danuve Jul 24 '12 at 14:09
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Going on the edge of crystal clear you would obviously need to use an update statement like UPDATE sub_count_tbl SET count = count-1 WHERE count > 1. The important play being WHERE count > 1 which makes the update do nothing if the count has already been lowered. –  Mihai Stancu Jul 24 '12 at 14:13
    
I have a subscription table which associates (User-Products) PKs, this would introduce some kind of redundancy but it doesn't matter. –  Dave Danuve Jul 24 '12 at 14:15

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