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I recently added a Disabled property to one of my domain entities. I have a List<T> of those entities in a view model. I just changed the getter to filter the list based on a UI setting to selectively show items that are disabled.

public ObservableCollection<CustomVariableGroup> CustomVariableGroups
{
    get
    {
        if (this.ShowDisabled) { return this._customVariableGroups; }

        return new ObservableCollection<CustomVariableGroup>(this._customVariableGroups.Where(x => x.Disabled == false));
    }
}

The problem is that when I now try to do this (in the same view model), the item doesn't get added to the collection.

this.CustomVariableGroups.Add(newGroup);

And I think I know why: The newGroup is being added to the new ObservableCollection<T>, not the backing field of _customVariableGroups.

If the LINQ Where() extension method was able to return ObservableCollection<T> (the type of the private backing field itself) instead of IEnumerable, I don't think I'd have this issue. As it stands now, since Where() returns IEnumerable<T>, I need to wrap that inside a new ObservableCollection<T>.

What is the right/best way for me to add a new item within the same view model? Do I need to add it directly to the private backing field? I don't want to do that because I don't want to have to remember not to use the property itself.

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That's why I'm asking for help, bud. Instead of just calling it bad, can you suggest how to make it right? –  Bob Horn Jul 24 '12 at 13:39
    
Each time you call your property, a new observable collection is created.... –  Steve B Jul 24 '12 at 13:39
    
I'm aware of that. –  Bob Horn Jul 24 '12 at 13:40
1  
At a higher level, where is the code this.CustomVariableGroups.Add(newGroup); located? You should create once the observable collection, and sync in some way the two lists. What is the type of CustomVariableGroups? Can't you simply create a collection source with filter over this property? –  Steve B Jul 24 '12 at 13:43
    
That code is in the same view model class, and it gets called when the user wants to add a new group. CustomVariableGroups is of type ObservableCollection<CustomVariableGroup> as shown in the code above. –  Bob Horn Jul 24 '12 at 13:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

instead of binding to your collection directly, you could bind to a ICollectionView and set a Filter in your Disabled property. no need to alter the source collection.

EDIT:

viewmodel:

 //this collection just init once - eg. in ctor, use add, remove, clear to alter
 public ObservableCollection<CustomVariableGroup> CustomVariableGroups {get; private set; }
 //create just once in ctor
 public ICollectionView MyView {get; private set;}

 //ctor
 this.CustomVariableGroups = new ObservableCollection<CustomVariableGroup>();
 this.MyView = CollectionViewSource.GetDefaultView(this.CustomVariableGroups);

 //in your disabled property set the filter
    public bool ShowDisabled
    {
        get { return _showDisabled; }
        set { 
            _showDisabled = value;

            if (_showDisabled)
                //show just disabled
                this.MyView.Filter = (item) =>
                                         {
                                             var myitem = (CustomVariableGroup) item;
                                             return myitem.Disabled;
                                         };
            else
            {
                //show all
                this.MyView.Filter = (item) => { return true; };
            }


            this.NotifyPropertyChanged("ShowDisabled"); }
    }

xaml

    <CheckBox Content="ShowDisabled" IsChecked="{Binding ShowDisabled}"/>
    <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding MyView}" Grid.Row="1">
        <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}"/>
            </DataTemplate>
        </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    </ListBox>

this works in my testproject

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Can you show an example? Is this XAML or C#? –  Bob Horn Jul 24 '12 at 14:22
    
done, see my edit –  blindmeis Jul 25 '12 at 9:05
    
Thank you! I'm not in a position to try this at the moment. I should be able to try it tonight or tomorrow. –  Bob Horn Jul 25 '12 at 12:28
    
How would the view model have a reference to CollectionViewSource? –  Bob Horn Jul 25 '12 at 16:30
    
?? the code i posted is just viewmodel code, you just have to add the ICollectionView related stuff and all is working. i dont know what you mean with: "How would the view model have a reference to CollectionViewSource?" CollectionViewSource is from the System.Windows.Data namespace in PresentationFramework.dll. you just have to use it to create your ICollectionView from your ObservableCollection. –  blindmeis Jul 26 '12 at 6:19

As mentioned in the comments, the right way to solve this is in the view, not the view model. This is a view concern only. I thought I'd post how I handled it, just in case this helps someone else.

First, the getter (view model) should just return the full list every time:

public ObservableCollection<CustomVariableGroup> CustomVariableGroups
{ get { return this._customVariableGroups; } }

Then, in the view, I added the filter event to my CollectionViewSource:

<CollectionViewSource x:Key="SortedGroups" Source="{Binding CustomVariableGroups}" Filter="CollectionViewSource_Filter">

And to get the list to refresh every time I clicked the Show Disabled checkbox:

Command="{Binding RefreshVariableGroupCommand}"

Then, in the code behind, I implemented the filter:

private void CollectionViewSource_Filter(object sender, FilterEventArgs e)
{
    CustomVariableGroup customVariableGroup = e.Item as CustomVariableGroup;

    if (customVariableGroup == null) { return; }

    if ((bool)chkShowDisabled.IsChecked)
    {
        // Show everything
        e.Accepted = true;
        return;
    }

    // We are not showing disabled items, so set disabled items e.Accepted to false.
    if (customVariableGroup.Disabled == true)
    {
        e.Accepted = false;
        return;
    }

    e.Accepted = true;
}

The only part about this, that I don't like, is that I'm using MVVM and trying to avoid code-behind classes. But, it's better to have this than hack the view model.

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you could do the same in your viewmodel, see my answer –  blindmeis Jul 25 '12 at 10:34

I would maintain your backing List and then raise the property changed for your ObservableCollection.

public ObservableCollection<CustomVariableGroup> CustomVariableGroups
{
    get
    {
        if (this.ShowDisabled) { return this._customVariableGroups; }

        return new ObservableCollection<CustomVariableGroup>  (this._customVariableGroups.Where(x => x.Disabled == false));
    }
}

// adds to the backing list but raises on property to rebuild and
// return the ObservableCollection
public void AddCustomVariableGroup(CustomVariableGroup newGroup)
{    
    this._customVariableGroups.Add(newGroup);
    OnPropertyChanged("CustomVariableGroups");
}

//Example invocation
AddCustomVariableGroup(newGroup);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but now a developer has to remember not to use the property. I was trying to avoid that. –  Bob Horn Jul 24 '12 at 14:28

I had a similar problem with a WinPhone app when showing filtered result. My solution was to bind to the "ShowDisabled" property change and on this event simply Clear() and readd stuff into the main Observable: CustomVariableGroups in this case. Something like this:

public bool ShowDisabled
{
    get
    {
        return showDisabled;
    }
    set
    {
        if (showDisabled!= value)
        {
            showDisabled = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("ShowDisabled");
        }
    }
}

In the constructor add this: this.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(MyViewModel_PropertyChanged);

And in the Event Handler:

 void MyViewModel_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
 {
     if (e.PropertyName == "ShowDisabled")
     {
         CustomVariableGroups.Clear();
         foreach (var cvg in AllVariableGroups.Where(x => !x.Disabled))
         {
             CustomVariableGroups.Add(cvg);
         }
     }
 }

The component bound to the CustomVariableGroups should update accordingly.

Disclaimer: of course there is a performance impact in this and you need to decide if it is negligible or not.

share|improve this answer
    
This would not work. By clearing the collection before executing the Linq query, you are querying an empty collection. –  JKor Jul 24 '12 at 13:52
    
whoops, sorry I was just copying and pasting from existing code and changing the names. Of course he will need to query from a backing property that always contains all the elements, or query before clearing the collection and then add. I edited the answer. –  Tallmaris Jul 24 '12 at 13:58
    
@Tallmaris Thanks, but this really seems more like a work-around than a proper approach. I'm hoping for something a little more simple/clean/elegant. –  Bob Horn Jul 24 '12 at 14:27

I would do something like @Tallmaris, but instead of this in the MyViewModel_PropertyChanged:

     CustomVariableGroups.Clear();
     foreach (var cvg in CustomVariableGroups.Where(x => !x.Disabled))
     {
         CustomVariableGroups.Add(cvg);
     }

Do this:

     foreach(var cvg in CustomVariableGroups.Where( x => x.Disabled))
     {
         CustomVariableGroups.Remove(cvg);
     }

And if that doesn't work (depends if Enumerable.Where uses iterator blocks, I think), you can do this:

     foreach(var cvg in Custom VariableGroups.Where( x=> x.Disabled).ToList())
     {
         CustomVariableGroups.Remove(cvg);
     }
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