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This class ctor is leaking memory, I cant say what is going on. How I know? If I comment out the second ctor line, the leak goes away.

template< class T, int fixedSize >
class Resource_Cache{

private:

    ID3D11Device * m_pDeviceRef;    // the one that actually can create stuff

    UINT m_iCurrentIndex;           // next slot to be allocated, also the ID of the resources
    //UINT m_nFreedSlots;               // how many freed slot there are?

    T* m_cache[fixedSize];          // the container per se

    struct SlotInfo{

        UINT nUseCount;
        Resource_Descriptor<T> desc;

    } m_slotsInfo[fixedSize];//use a hashtable<desc,index on m_cache>;


    Resource_Cache();   //denied default ctor

public:

    Resource_Cache( ID3D11Device * pDevice_p ): m_pDeviceRef(pDevice_p), m_iCurrentIndex(0){

        memset(m_cache, NULL, fixedSize*sizeof(T*));
        memset( m_slotsInfo, 0, fixedSize*sizeof(SlotInfo));    // zero slotsInfo memory(CAUSING LEAKS)
    }
 ...

Might be simple stuff, but Im clueless..

  • EDIT TO ANSWER - As PermanentGuest said: No. It doesn't give problems for elementary types. But, if your type T of Resource_Descriptor has some implementation which allocates memory in the constructor(e.g, string) by memset, you would be resetting any internal pointers of that class to NULL, thereby denying its destructor a chance to delete the memory. – PermanentGuest

std::string was the problem, solved.

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3  
A memset won't cause a "leak" on its own. What is Resource_Descriptor<T> exactly? –  user7116 Jul 24 '12 at 13:52
3  
How did you deduce you have a leak? –  sharptooth Jul 24 '12 at 13:52
    
How do you instantiate Resource_Cache? on heap or stack? –  PermanentGuest Jul 24 '12 at 13:54
    
@sixlettervariables: Resource_Descriptor<T> is a empty class, where I provide a specialization for T for each resource...I know its not a clean approach, but is what I have now.. –  Icebone1000 Jul 24 '12 at 13:59
2  
@Icebone1000: No. It doesn't give problems for elementary types. But, if your type T of Resource_Descriptor has some implementation which allocates memory in the constructor(e.g, string) by memset, you would be resetting any internal pointers of that class to NULL, thereby denying its destructor a chance to delete the memory. –  PermanentGuest Jul 24 '12 at 14:10

1 Answer 1

Instead of

Resource_Cache( ID3D11Device * pDevice_p ): m_pDeviceRef(pDevice_p), m_iCurrentIndex(0){

        memset(m_cache, NULL, fixedSize*sizeof(T*));
        memset( m_slotsInfo, 0, fixedSize*sizeof(SlotInfo));    // zero slotsInfo memory(CAUSING LEAKS)
    }

do

Resource_Cache( ID3D11Device * pDevice_p )
    : m_pDeviceRef( pDevice_p )
    , m_iCurrentIndex()
    , m_cache()
    , m_slotsInfo()
{}

I'm pretty sure this will not cure the symptoms that you conclude are due to a memory leak, or the memory leak if there is one, but at least it eliminates the possible cause you've fixated on, by doing the zeroing in (safe) C++ instead of (unsafe) C.

Oh well, because of the unspecified not-described-at-all Resource_Descriptor<T> it might actually fix the problem. But you wouldn't be using memset if that wasn't a POD, now would you? Or, perhaps you would?

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1  
Isn't the constructors of m_cache etc called automatically? Why the initialization list needed at all? –  PermanentGuest Jul 24 '12 at 14:19
1  
m_cache and m_slostInfo are arrays, whats m_cache()/m_slostInfo() is doing? –  Icebone1000 Jul 24 '12 at 14:24
    
@PermanentGuest: m_cache is a raw array of raw pointers, i.e. it's a POD. it doesn't have constructors. in the name of efficiency, C++ lets it be uninitialized by default. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 24 '12 at 17:41
    
@Icebone1000: quoting the answer you commented on, "doing the zeroing in (safe) C++ instead of (unsafe) C". it's a good idea to read what you comment on, before you comment on it. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 24 '12 at 17:42
    
@downvoter: please explain your insight so that others can benefit from it, either that they learn something new about c++ or about you. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 24 '12 at 17:42

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