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I suppose a definition of native and built-in objects is required to answer this question. Here's what the ECMAScript spec defines these as:

4.3.6 native object

object in an ECMAScript implementation, independent of the host environment, that is present at the start of the execution of an ECMAScript program.

NOTE Standard native built-in objects are defined in this specification. Some native objects are built-in; others may be constructed during the course of execution of an ECMAScript program

4.3.7 built-in object

object supplied by an ECMAScript implementation, independent of the host environment, that is present at the start of the execution of an ECMAScript program

NOTE Standard built-in objects are defined in this specification, and an ECMAScript implementation may specify and define others. Every built-in object is a native object. A built-in constructor is a built-in object that is also a constructor.

I'm looking forward to an explanation of this one.

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I suppose "ruing" should be spelled "during"... –  Bergi Jul 24 '12 at 14:16
    
@Bergi - It should, and it is, in the annotated ES5 spec. –  James Allardice Jul 24 '12 at 14:17
    
...and also in the original PDF; I fixed it. @OP: Where did you copy that? –  Bergi Jul 24 '12 at 14:21
    
@LeilaHamon - Your excerpt which looks like it's from the spec doesn't actually match the ES5 spec... where is it from? (It's a bit closer to the ES3 spec, but your question is tagged [ecmascript-5]). –  James Allardice Jul 24 '12 at 14:21
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See this answer for a good explanation. –  rsp Jul 24 '12 at 14:29
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is what ES5 shows:

4.3.6 native object # Ⓣ object in an ECMAScript implementation whose semantics are fully defined by this specification rather than by the host environment.

NOTE Standard native objects are defined in this specification. Some native objects are built-in; others may be constructed during the course of execution of an ECMAScript program.

4.3.7 built-in object # Ⓣ object supplied by an ECMAScript implementation, independent of the host environment, that is present at the start of the execution of an ECMAScript program.

NOTE Standard built-in objects are defined in this specification, and an ECMAScript implementation may specify and define others. Every built-in object is a native object. A built-in constructor is a built-in object that is also a constructor.

As you can see, it's different that what you've shown.

Built-in objects are native objects made available by the ECMAScript-compliant engine. For example:

  • String
  • Object
  • Array
  • Undefined
  • Boolean
  • etc.

A native object is, for example:

var obj = {};

Or the list shown before. Built-in objects are native.

Also, you didn't show it, but a host object is an object dependant on the environment. For example, in browsers, the host object is window. There are other host objects such as document or XMLHttpRequest though.

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I think it's the other way around. The things you've listed as native objects are built-in, and an object created by a program is a native object. "built-in object... supplied by an ECMAScript implementation" –  James Allardice Jul 24 '12 at 14:29
    
@JamesAllardice: A built-in object is also a native object. –  Tim Down Jul 24 '12 at 14:31
    
Oh right, I confused both, let me edit. –  Florian Margaine Jul 24 '12 at 14:32
    
@TimDown - Yes, but not the other way around, which is how I interpreted this answer originally. e.g. String is a built-in object (and therefore a native object). var o = {}; is a native object, but not a built-in object. –  James Allardice Jul 24 '12 at 14:33
    
window is not the only host object. It just happens also to be the global object, therefore containing properties referring to other host objects. –  Tim Down Jul 24 '12 at 14:35
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Native object - means implemented not in ECMAScript itself. Buiilt-in object - the one that's provided by the engine. Think Math, String and such.

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It's not provided by "the environment", it's provided by the ECMAScript engine. Environment in the ES specification means that environment the engine is running in, for example a browser. –  Florian Margaine Jul 24 '12 at 14:36
    
My bad, sloppy term usage. –  Seva Alekseyev Jul 24 '12 at 15:15
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