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In Ruby, I can do this:

module Foo
end

class Bar
  include Foo
end

module Foo
  def do_something_instancey
    puts "I'm an instance!"
  end
end

Then, if I instantiate a Bar object, I can call do_something_instancey on it:

b = Bar.new
b.do_something_instancey

However, if I do this...

module Foo
  def self.included(base)
    def base.do_something_classy do
      puts "I'm a class!"
    end
  end
end

My understanding is that because I included Foo in Bar before defining that class method, I cannot call Bar.do_something_classy because it never got "attached" to Bar.

I realize that might be slightly inaccurate/not really the right terminology. Regardless, is there a way, in the above example, to attach a class method to Bar from Foo after the module has already been included?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's an example for both, class and instance methods:

module Foo
  def self.included(base)
    base.extend(ClassMethods)
  end

   module ClassMethods
   end
end

class Bar
  include Foo
end

module Foo
  def do_something_instancey
    puts "I'm an instance!"
  end

  module ClassMethods
    def do_something_classy
      puts "I'm a class!"
    end
  end
end

b = Bar.new
b.do_something_instancey
# => I'm an instance!
Bar.do_something_classy
# => I'm a class!

To add class methods to each class that has (already) included a specific module, you could traverse Ruby's ObjectSpace:

ObjectSpace.each_object(Class) do |klass|
  if klass.include? Foo
    klass.define_singleton_method(:do_something_classy) do
      puts "I'm a class!"
    end
  end
end
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That's a good start. However it still requires the base.extend(ClassMethods) part to take place before Foo is included in Bar. Can you think of any way to do this without such a requirement? –  Dan Tao Jul 24 '12 at 16:05
    
Why do you have to avoid extend? –  Stefan Jul 24 '12 at 16:29
    
It isn't that I have to avoid extend (or that I have to do anything, for that matter—I asked this question mostly to educate myself). Rather, I'm looking for an approach that can solve the problem entirely retroactively. In other words, I'm trying to figure out if this scenario is possible: I take your library, comprising a bunch of classes and modules that I'm not allowed to modify. Now I want to re-open one of your modules in my library such that I can also add class methods to the classes that have already included that module. Make sense? –  Dan Tao Jul 24 '12 at 16:55
    
I've updated my answer with another example. –  Stefan Jul 24 '12 at 17:54
    
Nice! Didn't know about the ObjectSpace module—I think this is exactly what I was looking for. –  Dan Tao Jul 24 '12 at 17:59

Description of retroactive_module_inclusion gem:

This gem circumvents the "dynamic module include" (aka "double inclusion") problem, which is the fact that M.module_eval { include N } does not make the methods of module N available to modules and classes which had included module M beforehand, only to the ones that include it thereafter. This behaviour hurts the least surprise principle, specially because if K is a class, then K.class_eval { include M } does make all methods of M available to all classes which had previously inherited it.

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