Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to be able to add an if statement into a linq query to add a second LET. Does anyone know if this is possible? Thanks

var query = from d in myList
group d by d.Date
into v
let dataSum = nv.Sum(x => x.Data)
select new MyObject(){ Date = nv.Key.Date, Data = dataSum}

//Invalid I know... but something like this is what I'm looking for
var query = from d in myList
group d by d.Date
into v
let dataSum = nv.Sum(x => x.Data)
if(secondaryData){ let dataSum2 = nv.Sum(x.Data2)}
select new MyObject(){ Date = nv.Key.Date, Data = dataSum}
share|improve this question
1  
That's not how LINQ is supposed to be used. What are you trying to do? –  SLaks Jul 24 '12 at 14:43
    
@SLaks I'm trying to make the query generic enough to be able to be used in a condition where I need to have 2 columns summed. I could write two queries but they would be almost identical. –  NullReference Jul 24 '12 at 14:45
    
@NullReference, a question starting from invalid syntax is unlikely to yield useful results (and useful as a reference, not just your very specific issue). I recommend that you start from what you are actually trying to accomplish instead. –  Diego Mijelshon Jul 24 '12 at 14:50
    
@DiegoMijelshon I added the "invalid syntax" as a sample of that I'm looking for... I'll add that as a note in the question. –  NullReference Jul 24 '12 at 14:59
    
@NullReference yes, but that doesn't make it a good question. Amiram has an answer that gives you a possible syntax, but it's impossible to know if that's what you really need. –  Diego Mijelshon Jul 24 '12 at 16:48

2 Answers 2

You can use the if shorthand:

let dataSum2 = secondaryData ? nv.Sum(x.Data2) : 0
share|improve this answer
3  
Ternary operator, for future reference. =) –  J. Steen Jul 24 '12 at 14:46
3  
@J.Steen - Actually it is a Conditional operator. A Ternary operator is an operator that takes 3 arguments –  Aducci Jul 24 '12 at 14:56
1  
Well, it's common enough to call it the ternary operator that both are accepted. Even if Microsoft do name it the conditional operator, yes. Then again, all knowing Wikipedia names it the ternary operator. =) –  J. Steen Jul 24 '12 at 15:27

Try this.

List<Product1> prods = new List<Product1>();
        prods.Add(new Product1() { ProductPrice = 1, ValidFrom = DateTime.Today });
        prods.Add(new Product1() { ProductPrice = 3, ValidFrom = DateTime.Today });
        prods.Add(new Product1() { ProductPrice = 2, ValidFrom = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-1) });
        prods.Add(new Product1() { ProductPrice = 5, ValidFrom = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-2) });
    // Put any logic you want in sumFunc. For any field you want like ProductPrice 
    Func<Product1, decimal> sumFunc = (p) => p.ProductPrice;

    var result = from c in prods
                 group c by c.ValidFrom into gd
                 let sum = gd.Sum(sumFunc)
                 select sum;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.