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I am new to Ruby, I'm writing a script that does the following:

  1. Accepts command line arguments
  2. Deletes a few directories based on specifying an argument.

What I want it to do:

./admin_bin -c
Removing files in /opt/sysnovo/tmp and /opt/sysnovo/data

I have this working! But... it's not in a rubyish way.

Here is my code:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
require 'rubygems'
require 'fileutils'
require 'optparse'


OptionParser.new do |o|
    o.on('-c') { |b| $clear = b }
    o.on('-h') { puts o; exit }
    o.parse!
end

# Two directories we want to specify.
tmp_dir = "/opt/sysnovo/tmp"
data_dir = "/opt/sysnovo/data"

# push this value to a variable so we can evaluate it.
test = $clear

if "#{test}" == "true"
    puts "Removing files in #{tmp_dir} and #{data_dir}"
    FileUtils.rm_rf("#{tmp_dir}/.", secure: true)
    FileUtils.rm_rf("#{data_dir}/.", secure: true)
else
    puts "Not removing files."
end

As you can see, I set $clear to #{test} and evaluate based on that. I know it's not correct. What's the correct way to do this? I'll be adding more arguments and functionality to this script later on.

P.S. I come from a bash background.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Option Parser use the True/False class to set the flags. You test should look like this :

If you do $clear.class => TrueClass. It's a bool.

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
require 'fileutils'
require 'optparse'


OptionParser.new do |o|
    o.on('-c') { |b| $clear = b }
    o.on('-h') { puts o; exit }
    o.parse!
end

# Two directories we want to specify.
tmp_dir = "/opt/sysnovo/tmp"
data_dir = "/opt/sysnovo/data"

# push this value to a variable so we can evaluate it.

if $clear
    puts "Removing files in #{tmp_dir} and #{data_dir}"
    FileUtils.rm_rf("#{tmp_dir}/.", secure: true)
    FileUtils.rm_rf("#{data_dir}/.", secure: true)
else
    puts "Not removing files."
end

You also only need to require 'rubygems' if you are using ruby <1.9.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Now when I start to add other functionality (I guess this is style?), would I keep just using if statements to do so? Or is there a more ruby way to do it? In bash I might of used functions. Would this be a good script to start using classes in? Not sure I want to do something like: if $clear # whatever end if $somethingelse #do whatever end etc –  awojo Jul 24 '12 at 15:20
    
One other question. What is this code doing: { |b| $clear = b } –  awojo Jul 24 '12 at 15:26
    
You would just keep going with the if statements. If you never reusing code you don't really need method/class at this point. Just do a linear flow. {|b| c = b} the object is passed to b, you then set c to b. –  Kassym Dorsel Jul 24 '12 at 17:38

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