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Normally, when a page is loaded, and the browser has Javascript disabled, we use the <noscript> tag to write something like a warning and tell the client to enable Javascript. However, Facebook, even after you load the page with JS enabled, the moment it's disabled you get a notification. How can I do something like this?

UPDATE : This mechanism is no longer available in Facebook, but it was before, I was too late in asking this question, but if any answer is found, I would really appreciate it.

What I have tried

I thought about having a segment inside my page which keeps checking if Javascript is disabled, if yes, show the contents of <noscript>.

To Achieve this, I created a page CheckJS.html.

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0">
</head>
<body>
    <noscript>
       JS is disabled!
    </noscript>
</body>
</html>

This page will keep on refreshing, when JS is disabled, JS is disabled! will appear.

To add this page inside my original page. I tried the following:

1- .load()

I used JQuery to .load('CheckJS.html') inside a div. However, it seems that .load() only loads the contents of the <body> of CheckJS.html. Means the <head> element and what's inside it will not be loaded inside the div.

2- iframe

After some searching, I found that the only possible way to load a FULL html page including <head> is to use an <iframe>.

<iframe src="CheckJS.html"></iframe>

However, the <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0"> of CheckJS.html affects the parent page, the original page itself started refreshing.

If we are able to use this <iframe> without forcing the original page to refresh, then this could be a solution, but even if this solution is found, I feel its more of a trick rather than a real solution.


UPDATE

Antony 's answer proved that I was wrong about that the iframe refreshes the original page, the browser shows that its refreshing but actually its not, if this is it, then Javascript can be avoided, the CheckJS.html that I provided does the job, and even better, the <noscript> will be hidden when JS is re-enabled. Still this whole iframe approach isn't so user friendly (could freeze the browser), unless refresh occurs every 10 seconds or so, which isn't an instant detection.

share|improve this question
    
I don't get a notification disabling javascript, using Firefox 13.0.1 –  jAndy Jul 24 '12 at 15:23
9  
@Sarfraz Er, what? If JS is disabled, it's completely disabled. You can't catch exceptions because no JS code runs at all. –  duskwuff Jul 24 '12 at 15:28
    
@Ali What browser are you using to produce this behavior? –  apsillers Jul 24 '12 at 15:52
    
@apsillers as jAndy said, this behavior is no longer there, but it was before, I was late in asking this question, but if there's an answer I would really appreciate. –  Ali Bassam Jul 24 '12 at 16:08
1  
@unor Yes without a page reload, in Firefox, I disable Javascript by un-checking the Javascript checkbox in Tools > Options > Content, Javascript/JQuery functions will stop working. –  Ali Bassam Feb 7 '13 at 16:59

6 Answers 6

CSS Solution

See DEMO. Also available as a JS library.

Stop the CSS animation by continuously replacing the element with JavaScript. Once JavaScript is disabled, the CSS animation kicks in and displays a message.

@keyframes Browser compatibility: Chrome, Firefox 5.0+, IE 10+, Opera 12+, Safari 4.0+

<style>
.nojs_init { 
position: relative;
animation:nojs-animation 0.2s step-end;
-moz-animation:nojs-animation 0.2s step-end; /* Firefox */
-webkit-animation:nojs-animation 0.2s step-end; /* Safari and Chrome */
-o-animation:nojs-animation 0.2s step-end; /* Opera */
}

@keyframes nojs-animation
{
from {visibility:hidden;opacity:0;}
to {visibility:visible;opacity:1;}
}

@-moz-keyframes nojs-animation /* Firefox */
{
from {visibility:hidden;opacity:0;}
to {visibility:visible;opacity:1;}
}

@-webkit-keyframes nojs-animation /* Safari and Chrome */
{
from {visibility:hidden;opacity:0;}
to {visibility:visible;opacity:1;}
}

@-o-keyframes nojs-animation /* Opera */
{
from {visibility:hidden;opacity:0;}
to {visibility:visible;opacity:1;}
}
</style>
<body>
<div id="content"></div>
<div id="nojs" class="nojs_init"><noscript>JavaScript is <span style="font-weight:bold;">disabled</span>.</noscript></div>
</body>
<script>
document.getElementById("content").innerHTML = 'JavaScript is <span style="font-weight:bold;">enabled</span>. Try disabling JavaScript now.';

var elm = document.getElementById("nojs"),
    animation = false,
    animationstring = 'animation',
    keyframeprefix = '',
    domPrefixes = 'Webkit Moz O ms Khtml'.split(' '),
    pfx  = '';

if( elm.style.animationName ) { animation = true; }    

if( animation === false ) {
  for( var i = 0; i < domPrefixes.length; i++ ) {
    if( elm.style[ domPrefixes[i] + 'AnimationName' ] !== undefined ) {
      pfx = domPrefixes[ i ];
      animationstring = pfx + 'Animation';
      keyframeprefix = '-' + pfx.toLowerCase() + '-';
      animation = true;
      break;
    }
  }
}

// Continuously replace element
function jsdetect() {
    var elm = document.getElementById("nojs");
    var newone = elm.cloneNode(true);
    elm.parentNode.replaceChild(newone, elm);
}

// Only apply to browsers that support animation
if (animation) {
    elm.innerHTML = 'JavaScript is <span style="font-weight:bold;">disabled</span>.';
    setInterval(jsdetect, 0);
}
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
This one "freezes" my Firefox while jsdetect.html is reloaded, but: it works! –  unor Feb 8 '13 at 3:02
    
This proved that I was wrong about that the iframe refreshes the original page, the browser shows that its refreshing but actually its not, if this is it, then Javascript can be avoided, the CheckJS.html that I provided does the job, and even better, the <noscript> will be hidden when JS is re-enabled. Still this whole iframe approach isn't so user friendly (could freeze the browser just like @unor said), unless refresh occurs every 10 seconds or so, which isn't an instant detection. –  Ali Bassam Feb 8 '13 at 3:35
    
@unor I tried not to overload Firefox with setInterval, but for some reason, Firefox doesn't perform a "meta refresh" if that statement is written through JavaScript (instead of being loaded together with the document). –  Antony Feb 8 '13 at 8:35
    
@AliBassam See updated answer using CSS. –  Antony Feb 8 '13 at 11:57
    
@Antony Nice solution but it's not that perfect, even with such a small amount of time (40 and 6 msec) I could notice that sometimes the message appears even without JS disabled, and increasing the time would even make it worse, and in order to work, the client has to disable it before it gets the class nojs_hide, which isn't a 100% possibility. –  Ali Bassam Feb 8 '13 at 14:18

Hrm, I think it depends on the browser. HTML5 supports <noscript> in the HEAD element, so you might try something like this:

<style>
    .noscriptMessage {
         display: none;
     }
</style>
<noscript>
    <style>
        .noscriptMessage {
             display: block
        }
    </style>
</noscript>

<body>
    <div class=".noscriptMessage">Foo bar baz</div>
    ...
</body>

Spec: http://dev.w3.org/html5/markup/noscript.html

From the spec:

Permitted contents: Zero or more of: one link element, or one meta http-equiv=default-style element, or one meta http-equiv=refresh element, or one style element

Edit: hey peeps, SO does the very same! Just try turning off JS now.

share|improve this answer
    
does this really work or is that just an assumption ? –  jAndy Jul 24 '12 at 15:31
    
Tis a guess, but based on what the spec says I think it's worth a try. –  karim79 Jul 24 '12 at 15:33
1  
btw, I think you want to have some kind of a node, like a <div> within the noscript tag which owns the class noscriptMessage –  jAndy Jul 24 '12 at 15:34
    
I always use a meta refresh tag within a noscript tag which redirects to a page for people who have javascript disabled. that is if javascript is required and there is no graceful degradation. this way they don't sit on a page with broken stuff in the mean time. –  dqhendricks Jul 24 '12 at 15:39
    
@dqhendricks: but does that satisfy the requirement here too ? Like you just randomly disable JS while beeing on the site already ? –  jAndy Jul 24 '12 at 15:43

What about javascript code that continuously postpones a http-equiv=refresh (each time replacing the meta element?) As soon as javascript is turned off, the meta element is no longer replaced and the refresh will eventually take place. This is just a thought, I've no idea if meta element insertion is even possible.

share|improve this answer
    
While trying to work on this I found something weird, I planned on to postponing the meta refresh, by changing its content continousisly to let's say, 1 second, then change it again to 1 second before that 1 second passes by, so when JS is disabled, the refresh will take place, however, I cannot change the content of meta refresh: stackoverflow.com/questions/14790065/… –  Ali Bassam Feb 12 '13 at 4:22

I'd recommend looking into how this is done by HTML5 Boilerplate and Modernizr.

If you look at HTML5 Boilerplate's HTML, on line 7 you'll see the <html> tag is given a class of no-js. Then, when Modernizr's JavaScript runs, the first thing it does is remove the no-js class.

That done, you could apply CSS rules that only display content if the no-js class is present:

#no-script-message {
    display: none;
}
.no-js #no-script-message {
    display: block;
}
share|improve this answer
    
How is this related to instant detection? –  Antony Feb 9 '13 at 19:57
    
@Antony Modernizr is designed to be the first script on a page. The first thing the script does is remove the no-js class from the html tag. That way, if JS is disabled, the class will stay put, and if it's enabled, it goes away on page load. This way, you can just put .no-js on the beginning of any CSS selector for elements you want styled different if JavaScript is disabled. –  JoshMock Feb 13 '13 at 17:45
    
As I'm reading more answers and comments on this thread, I think what you're looking for isn't possible. It'd require a browser to fire some an event when a particular configuration change is made, and then that event would need to be watched by something that can react to it. The only thing in a browser that can react dynamically to an event is JavaScript, so if the user just turned it off, there'd be no way to respond to that event. –  JoshMock Feb 13 '13 at 17:51
    
What about my answer that uses CSS animation to "detect" if JavaScript is turned off? –  Antony Feb 13 '13 at 17:58

Expanding upon @JoshMock's answer, here is a simple approach (via Paul Irish) to detect if the client has JS enabled:

HTML

<html class="no-js">
<head>
  <script>(function(H){H.className=H.className.replace(/\bno-js\b/,'js')})(document.documentElement)</script>

This should be compatible with all browsers and is quite fast. Then you can hide/show elements in your css with .js and .no-js classes.

If you are doing any other feature detection, I would suggest using Modernizr with the html class="no-js" markup (modernizr will automatically add the js classes for you, along with css3 detection).

share|improve this answer
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, here's what I understood: At the beginning, the <html> is given a class no-js, when page loads, that class is changed to js, and in CSS, the message will show when the class is no-js. So when I load the page with JS disabled, the class won't be changed, so the message will be shown. If this is the case, then what about instantly detecting when the client disables JS? –  Ali Bassam Feb 7 '13 at 20:53
1  
I do not think that there is a more "instant" way of detecting this. You cannot detect for the absence of javascript without javascript, and there is no cross-browser method of doing this either (at least that I know of). The small line of javascript is going to execute faster before any element on the page. If you are trying to detect if the client has disabled JS after the page has loaded (which is an edge case at best, then @karim79's no-script solution is best (for browsers that support it) –  Nick Tomlin Feb 7 '13 at 22:38
4  
@AliBassam, Looking at how you are ignoring good answers, I would say - Stop all this madness and start building a new Web, with less bullshit, and more JavaScript –  Om Shankar Feb 9 '13 at 8:44
1  
@OmShankar The OP has always been asking for a way to instantly detect the absence of JavaScript. If an answer doesn't address the question directly, no matter how good its content is, is still irrelevant. –  Antony Feb 9 '13 at 19:51
    
@NickTomlin You can use something other than JavaScript to detect the absence of JavaScript. And I haven't come across a browser that supports karim79's solution (it only works onload, not after it). –  Antony Feb 9 '13 at 20:11

Actually, it is easier to detect if java-script is supported by the browser than the opposite.

Of course, this is in the case of 'a site instantly detect javascript'. Witch is the very first http-request <--> response from the browser to the server. You just 'cannot'. You would have to send another request to the server after determining browser capabilities.

Now, there is no way of checking if JavaScript is enabled from the server-side on the first request. So, if JavaScript is disabled, you have to do a postback, or redirect to a non JavaScript page, using what some other suggested (witch is not valid, but seems to work):

<head>
    <noscript><meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; url=whatyouwant.html"></noscript>
...
</head>

There are some 'browser capabilities' and browser 'plugins' that can be get with http request, so you would need a good 'server-side' script to meet your goal.

See browserhawk or quirksmode for some infos on a javascript to detect browser.

Also, there is a 'protected' question aboout how-to-detect-if-javascript-is-disabled

share|improve this answer
    
@Ali Bassam (& and others) for sure if you modify your question, this answer will look irrelevant and down-voted. –  Milky ways patterns Feb 8 '13 at 13:05
    
The OP has been asking for a way to instantly detect the absence of JavaScript. This idea is never changed. –  Antony Feb 9 '13 at 19:47
    
@Antony you're right, the idea never changed. Still, there is no way 'yet' to detect 'instantly' browser capabilities. –  Milky ways patterns Feb 11 '13 at 13:35

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