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We have a full screen java program running on a Linux box. The program is always running, and is the primary reason for the Linux box existing.

We have a bunch of PDF Help files for the program that can be opened through a dropdown menu. When a user clicks one of the help menu items we open XPDF through

    final Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
    final String cmd = "runxpdf.sh";
    rt.exec(cmd);

This all works fine except that if the user clicks on our program while the XPDF viewer is running it will fall behind our full screen program display.

What we'd like to be able to do is to keep the XPDF program always on top until it is closed. Is this possible to do through executing a program from Java?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you need to communicate to a different program, the window manager, to direct that program to keep the window raised.

In X window based systems, there used to be a tool called wmctrl which would make requests and queries to the current window manager, provided that it was a compliant window manager. I had mixed results using such a tool. Of the 20 or so Linux window managers, the most popular ones do a better job of handling requests (perhaps that's why they are popular?).

The command to switch desktop to the window, raise and focus is

wmctrl -i -a <Window Id>

To get a list of windows managed by the window manager

wmctrl -l

While this won't guaranteed "always on top", you could write a Thread looping to check and re-raise a window.

As far as a windows solution, someone else will have to comment on that.

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Note that wmctrl is not installed on many systems, you might have to install it. In addition, I am not aware of a 100% Java library which might make the same call, and I haven't looked into the underlying mechanism of the (assumed network) call. –  Edwin Buck Jul 24 '12 at 16:28
    
yeah this sounds about right to me, i have used wmctrl in the keys file of fluxbox to bring various things to the top upon mouse/keyboard combinations in the past. –  lynks Jul 24 '12 at 16:43
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A tad tangent, but I think worth a try - have you considered displaying the PDF directly from Java? Then you have more control over the window e.g. with JFrame's setAlwaysOnTop(boolean). Some PDF displaying options are discussed here.

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Yeah this is one of the options we were looking at, but at the time we chose xpdf (a few years back) the java based pdf displayers that we tried seemed buggy. Could be time to take another look. –  Garrett Aug 22 '12 at 14:25
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