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I've been using Dapper and with my current project I'm going to have to use ADO.NET. My question is how do I return an IEnumerable using ADO.NET? Here is what I have using Dapper. Can someone help me with converting this to do the same but with ADO?

public IEnumerable<Favorites> GetFavorites()
{
    using (SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connString))
    {
        sqlConnection.Open();
        var work = sqlConnection.Query<Favorites>("Select * from favorites");
        return work;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you happy working with DataSets and DataRows for your entities (e.g. Favourites) or do you need strongly-typed classes? – davenewza Jul 24 '12 at 15:34
3  
Just iterate through the DataSet rows, yielding a new Favorite object for each one – paul Jul 24 '12 at 15:35
2  
@paul ADO.NET does not necessarily mean "DataSet". That is a layer on top of ADO.NET – Marc Gravell Jul 24 '12 at 15:39
9  
Just saying... dapper entirely uses ADO.NET. You could just bring the single .cs file (SqlMapper.cs IIRC) into your project, call it "MyUsefulUtility.cs" instead of "dapper". I won't mind, and we won't tell anyone ;p – Marc Gravell Jul 24 '12 at 15:41
5  
Got to love SO... You just asked how you can emulate Dapper in your ADO.net project. And one of the authors (@MarcGravell) of Dapper just told you which .cs file to grab and rename to emulate it in your project. One word, Awesome!!! – jsmith Jul 24 '12 at 15:46
up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can use yield return like so:

public IEnumerable<Favorites> GetFavorites()
{
    using (SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connString))
    {
        sqlConnection.Open();
        using (SqlCommand cmd = sqlConnection.CreateCommand())
        {
            cmd.CommandText = "Select * from favorites";
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            {
                while (reader.Read())
                {
                    // Create a Favorites instance
                    var favorites = new Favorites();
                    favorites.Foo = reader["foo"];
                    // ... etc ...
                    yield return favorites;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Obviously, you can refactor this by creating a Favorites constructor that accepts an IDataReader or SqlDataReader, or creating a utility method to populate the values, or whatever, but this is the basic structure.

share|improve this answer

If you can do you work all within the using block, you can take advantage of LINQ and the IEnumerable interface on DbDataReader. It provides self-contained pure ADO.NET with a reasonably small amount of code.

var command = connection.CreateCommand();
command.CommandText = "select * from favorites";
using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader()) {
    var work = from IDataRecord r in select ...;
    ... use work ...
}
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