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I found one answer of resize an array in python ctypes

from ctypes import *

list = (c_int*1)()

def customresize(array, new_size):
    resize(array, sizeof(array._type_)*new_size)
    return (array._type_*new_size).from_address(addressof(array))

list[0] = 123
list = customresize(list, 5)

>>> list[0]
123
>>> list[4]
0

if i call it again:

list = customresize(list, 40)

it gives error:

ValueError: Memory cannot be resized because this object doesn't own it

why it works only for the first time you call customresize()? I also saw some one post another answer:

def customresize(array, new_size):
    return (array._type_*new_size).from_address(addressof(array))

here customresize() works no matter how many times you call it.

but it raises another question, i found my python.exe does not use more memory when you resize list to a larger size, which means the memory is not allocated for the resized list. Is that very dangerous to give the accessibility to memory without allocation? why ctypes.resize is designed this way? Really get confused....

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

from_address is dangerous because it does not ensure that you have allocated the memory you are accessing, so it can lead to your application crashing or worse. In addition it does not own the memory it points to so if the original owner is deleted the memory could be reused for something else.

One option here would be to keep a reference to the original array:

def customresize(array, new_size):
    base = getattr(array, 'base', array)
    resize(base, sizeof(array._type_)*new_size)
    new_array = (array._type_*new_size).from_address(addressof(base))
    new_array.base = base

Alternatively and much safer, you can just create a new array from the old one:

list = (c_int * 5)(*list)
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Let me summarize this issue myself. but please credit to @ecatmur and others The resize() function can be used to resize the memory buffer of an existing ctypes object. The function takes the object as first argument, and the requested size in bytes as the second argument. However, the resized object still has limited accessibility to the memory buffer based on its original size. to solve the problem. 3 different functions are defined:

def customresize1(array, new_size):
    resize(array, sizeof(array._type_)*new_size)
    return (array._type_*new_size).from_address(addressof(array))
def customresize2(array, new_size):
    return (array._type_*new_size).from_address(addressof(array))
def customresize3(array, new_size):
    base = getattr(array, 'base', array)
    resize(base, sizeof(array._type_)*new_size)
    new_array = (array._type_*new_size).from_address(addressof(base))
    new_array.base = base

all functions return an object that shares the memory of the original owner, which does not own the memory and can not be resized (e.g., gives error in customresize1)

customresize2 does return a resized array, but keey in mind that from_address does not allocate memory for resizing..

customresize3 keeps a record of the base object that owns the memory, but the returned object is not the owner of memory

As python is dynamically allocating its memory and garbage collecting, so, if you want to resize something, just redo the size will work. eg.:

list = (c_int * NEW_SIZE)()

or you may want to keep the original values then:

list = (c_int * NEW_SIZE)(*list)
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