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I am making my first gui in C# and I have watched/read a ton of tutorials about WPF and MVVM(that's the approach I'm using), but I am stuck on something that intuitively should be rather simple to accomplish. I have a listbox, and above it I would like to display a textblock or label that would say "Please select item from list" and then disappear once an item is selected.

How can I accomplish this? Would it require writing in the code-behind? Most tutorials I have read discourage ever using the code-behind so I would prefer a different solution. I assume this is not possible to do directly from within XAML, so would I need to create a ViewModel variable to hold the listbox state?? If so, then how could I make a textblock/label dependent on a variable?

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I appreciate everyone's quick responses. They all work and all gave me some insight about XAML and MVVM. I decided to go with LPL's solution because it is the easiest to implement and is done purely in XAML. –  sebo Jul 24 '12 at 16:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For doing this in XAML only

<StackPanel>
    <TextBlock Text="Please select an item!">
        <TextBlock.Style>
            <Style TargetType="TextBlock">
                <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Collapsed" />
                <Style.Triggers>
                    <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding SelectedItem, ElementName=lb}" Value="{x:Null}">
                        <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Visible" />
                    </DataTrigger>
                </Style.Triggers>
            </Style>
        </TextBlock.Style>
    </TextBlock>
    <ListBox Name="lb" ItemsSource="12345" />
</StackPanel>

ItemsSource="12345" will create five rows for demonstration only.

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Thank you, your solution worked best for me. –  sebo Jul 24 '12 at 16:23

In your viewmodel, make a public bool property "VisibilityOfLabel"

private bool visibilityOfLabel;

public bool VisibilityOfLabel 
{
     get
     {
         return visibilityOfLabel;
     } 

     set
     {
         visibilityOfLabel = value;
         RaisePropertyChanged("VisibilityOfLabel");
     }
}

And in your XAML, if you have already set the DataContext to your ViewModel, Bind the Label Visibility to that property

<Label Content="{Binding LabelText}" Visible="{Binding VisibilityOfLabel}" />

Then, when your Combobox changes, just set the value to true or false

EDIT You will have to use Visibility here. There is already a builtin converter available for you here: System.Windows.Controls.BooleanToVisibilityConverter

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Mare Infinitus, there doesn't seem to be a Visible property in XAML. And, when I try to use Visibility, it doesn't work. It seems that simply setting the property Visibility to a boolean doesn't get the job done, however, I got it to work by making a public variable Visibility. –  sebo Jul 25 '12 at 15:38
    
I see, you have to use Visibility which accepts only enum values. In another answer, I saw an BoolToVisibility Converter. That will do the job that you need additionally to this. –  Mare Infinitus Jul 25 '12 at 16:03

You are correct. you will create a viewmodel variable that will hold the selected list box item. You would also create another variable that will hold the visibility of the textblock. You can then set the visibility of the text block from the viewmodel

private string _selectedListBoxItem;
private boolean _textBlockVisibility

public string SelectedListBoxItem
{
get {return _selectedListBoxItem;}
set{_selectedListBoxItem=value;
_textBlockVisibility=false;}
}

public Boolean TextBlockVisibilty
{
get{return _textBlockVisibility;};
set {_textBlockVisibility=value;};
}

Your xaml would bind the visibility of the textblock to the TextBlockVisibility. You will have to use a visibility converter. Something like:

 public class BooleanVisibilityValueConverter : IValueConverter
    {
        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            if (value != null)
            {
                if (((bool)value) == true)
                    return Visibility.Visible;
                else
                    return Visibility.Collapsed;
            }

            return Visibility.Collapsed;
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {

            throw new Exception("The method or operation is not implemented.");

        }


    }
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While the view model approach is perfectly valid, you can do this entirely in XAML with no dependency on a view model.

<StackPanel>
  <TextBlock Text="Please make a selection">
    <TextBlock.Style>
      <Style>
        <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Hidden" />
        <Style.Triggers>
          <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding ElementName=TheListBox, Path=SelectedIndex}" Value="-1">
            <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Visible" />
          </DataTrigger>
        </Style.Triggers>
      </Style>
    </TextBlock.Style>
  </TextBlock>

  <ListBox x:Name="TheListBox" ... />
</StackPanel>

Here, all you're doing is monitoring the SelectedIndex which will be -1 until a selection is made. When the value is no longer -1, the text block will be hidden. The two reasons I like this approach:

  1. Less code to write
  2. This is strictly view logic and really doesn't need a view model to achieve the desired behavior
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Wow, totally different to my solution, except it will not work. ;) Visibility="Hidden" will take precedence over the style trigger. –  LPL Jul 24 '12 at 16:46
    
How will it take precedence? It's the default/fallback value, i.e., when the trigger binding evaluates to true, it sets visibility to Visible and when it's false, it falls back to the original value of Hidden. –  sellmeadog Jul 24 '12 at 18:19
    
Please read Dependency Property Value Precedence. A local value has higher precedence then a style trigger. That's why your Setter in Style has no chance to change the Visibility of TextBlock. –  LPL Jul 24 '12 at 18:22
    
Sorry. Brain fart. Took me a minute to realize I added the Visibility="Hidden" to the TextBlock directly and not as a setter in the style. Tested both our examples after the edit and they work. Just a matter of preference, i.e., SelectedIndex vs. SelectedItem. –  sellmeadog Jul 24 '12 at 18:34

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