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Does somebody know how to convert an arraylist to a list of dictionaries? What do I have? I have an ArrayList (list) with a lot of strings:

            foreach (string s in list)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(s);
            }

output:
klaus
male
spain
lissy
female
england
peter
male
usa
...

As we see there is an order. The first entry is a NAME, second GENDER, third COUNTRY and then again NAME, GENDER... and so on.

Now for clarity I would like to store these attributes in a List of Dictionaries. Every List entry should be 1 Dictionary with these 3 Attributes. Is this a good idea? Whats the easiest way? I just search something to store this list in a better looking collection that is later easiert to handle. I have this:

    List<Dictionary<string, string>> dlist = new List<Dictionary<string, string>>();
    const int separate = 3;

    foreach (string s in list)
    {
        //add list entries to dlist?
    }
share|improve this question
5  
You're working in a highly object-oriented language... Why not just create a class? –  voithos Jul 24 '12 at 16:08
    
Actually the second sequence is Name, Country Gender not Name Gender Country. But to .NET they are just strings. That's the problem with using Objects and Strings. Eventually they don't provide enough context as to the type of the data they represent. –  Christopher Painter Jul 24 '12 at 16:09
    
@voithos You mean a class with properties NAME, GENDER, COUNTRY and then create a List<MyClass>? –  miri Jul 24 '12 at 16:09
    
@ChristopherPainter oh sry, now I edited the output its always name, gender, country. –  miri Jul 24 '12 at 16:11
5  
Why are you still using ArrayLists? I doubt that you're using .NET 1.1 –  Tim Schmelter Jul 24 '12 at 16:12

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No it's not a good idea. Define a class.

At least something like this:

class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Gender { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
}

Even better would be to use an enum for Gender, and possibly a class (built-in or custom) for the country.

Anyway, to populate a collection with the above class, you'd use something like:

List<Person> result = new List<Person>();

for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i += 3) { 
    result.Add(
        new Person { Name = list[i], Gender = list[i+1], Country = list[i+2] }); 
} 

Note that this loop lacks error checking on the count of items in the list, which should be a multiple of three.

share|improve this answer
    
You can use a Tuple, anonymous types or a struct instead for such a simple data structure, a Class is major overkill unless it's going to be used for something else. Also he's asking how to parse the list, which you haven't answered. –  mattmanser Jul 24 '12 at 16:12
    
I guess you should give details about static factories to decode the single Person and a List<Person> –  Diego De Vita Jul 24 '12 at 16:12
1  
A tuple doesn't make it easier to handle. An anonymous type cannot be easily used outside the method that defines it. Furthermore, it IS a class, so I don't see how a class is overkill if an anonemous type is not. A struct really needs to be immutable to be safe to use. Given the level of the question, I'd avoid structs (and tuples) for now. –  Kris Vandermotten Jul 24 '12 at 16:15
2  
@mattmanser It is quite a bit more useful to make an actual class over using a Tuple. Giving actual names to properties beyond Item1, Item2, etc. makes the code much more readable, as does giving the whole thing some context (Person here). Anonymous types would only be applicable if this is used in the context of a single method, which doesn't appear to be the case. On top of that value semantics don't make sense here. A person isn't one value, so it shouldn't be a struct. –  Servy Jul 24 '12 at 16:16
1  
@mattmanser The OP isn't asking to do one simple task with this data. he's asking how to best store the data for later use. If he asked how to do one, simple thing with it, then it may make sense to use an anonymous type to store the data while doing that one thing. Since no one thing is mentioned, it's likely that there isn't just one simple thing being done with the data. If the OP were to provide more context for his problem we could provide a more targeted answer. Since he hasn't we need to provide an answer that works well with many realistic uses. Your suggestions limit those options. –  Servy Jul 24 '12 at 16:23
enum Gender
{
    Male = 0,
    Female = 1
}

class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Gender Gender { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }

    public Person(string name, Gender gender, string country)
    {
        this.Name = name;
        this.Gender = gender;
        this.Country = country;
    }
}

Usage:

List<Person> persons = new List<Person>();
Person person;
for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i += 3) {
{
    person = new Person(list[i], (Gender)Enum.Parse(typeof(Gender), list[i+1], true), list[i+2]);
    persons.add(person);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the better Way to do the job. –  Elwi Jul 24 '12 at 16:23
    
Don't you need to include a param in Enum.Parse to make it case-insensitive so that will work on his input? –  Tim S. Jul 24 '12 at 16:23
    
@TimS. Yes quite right. I've edited it. –  ForkandBeard Jul 24 '12 at 16:26

I would recommend using a class to encapsulate your entry:

class Entry
{
    public String Name { get; set; }
    public String Gender { get; set; }
    public String Country { get; set; }
}

Then add to a list of Entrys

List<Entry> elist = new List<Entry>();

for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i += 3)
{
    var ent = new Entry() { Name    = list[i],
                            Gender  = list[i+1],
                            Country = list[i+2]};
    elist.Add(ent);
}

Or you could use Tuples:

List<Tuple<string, string, string>> tlist = 
    new List<Tuple<string, string, string>>();

for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i += 3)
{
    Tuple<string,string, string> ent 
        = new Tuple<string,string,string>(list[i], list[i+1], list[i+2]);
    tlist.Add(ent);
}
share|improve this answer

the simplest way to implement that - it's create a new class for representing someone in you list with 3 props:

public class Someone {
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Gender { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
}

And than you can fill your destination list with Someone entries:

List<Someone> dList = new List<Someone>();
for(int i = 0; i < list.Count; i += 3)
    dList.Add(new Someone() { Name = list[i], Gender = list[i+1], Country = list[i+2] });

p.s. this code may contain errors because I don't have access to computer with VS installed.

share|improve this answer

You may have a class to hold the data like:

public class Info
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Gender { get; set; }
        public string Country { get; set; }
    }

then you can have a dictionary like this

Dictionary<int, Info> infoDict = new Dictionary<int, Info>();

then you can start reading and prepare the dictionary.

share|improve this answer
var listSrc = new List<string>
                    {
                        "klaus",
                        "male",
                        "spain",
                        "lissy",
                        "england",
                        "female",
                        "peter",
                        "usa",
                        "male",
                    };
var dlist = new List<Dictionary<string, string>>();

for (var i = 0; i < listSrc.Count; i++)
{
    var captions = new List<string>
                            {
                                "Name",
                                "Gender",
                                "Country"
                            };

    var list = listSrc.Take(3).ToList();
    listSrc.RemoveRange(0, 3);

    dlist.Add(list.ToDictionary(x => captions[list.IndexOf(x)], x => x));
}
share|improve this answer

Its simple. You are working for a class that contains three data variables named :

String name; String gender; String country;

So make a class that contains all three of these variables. As for eg:

class Dictnary
{

public Dictnary(String nameFromCall, String genderFromCall, String countryFromCall)
{
this.name = nameFromCall;
this.gender = genderFromCall;
this.country = countryFromCall;
}
}
share|improve this answer

To answer the question in the title, this is probably the most succinct way to do the conversion:

for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i += 3) {
    dlist.Add(new Dictionary<string, string>() {
        { "name", (string)list[i] },
        { "gender", (string)list[i+1] },
        { "country", (string)list[i+2] }
    });
}

(If you switch from an ArrayList to a List<string>, you can drop the (string) cast.)

That said, unless you really need a dictionary for some technical reason, your problem is better solved using one of the class-based approaches suggested in the other answers.

share|improve this answer
2  
Question was "Is this a good idea? [...] I just search something to store this list in a better looking collection that is later easiert to handle." Your answer seems to suggest that this is a good idea. It clearly is not. –  Kris Vandermotten Jul 24 '12 at 16:11
1  
@KrisVandermotten: There were a lot of questions in the text, one of them (at the beginning): "Does somebody know how to convert an arraylist to a list of dictionaries?". That's what I answered... ;-) –  Heinzi Jul 24 '12 at 16:13
2  
I asked how to do this and is this a good idea. This post is helping - even if maybe there is a better solution. So thank you Heinzi –  miri Jul 24 '12 at 16:14
1  
@Heinzi Doing this is not solving the real underlying problems. You're leaving all of the other questions unanswered, and beyond that, if you're going to give a literal answer to a question without actually addressing the real issues, you should at least say so and write a little disclaimer that this likely isn't the approach that should be followed. Encouraging poor coding behavior is more harmful in the long run for the OP. –  Servy Jul 24 '12 at 16:29
    
@Heinzi That is indeed true. I focussed on the other question. Your answer is indeed answering the first question. That being said, I still feel this technique should not be encouraged. –  Kris Vandermotten Jul 24 '12 at 16:30

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