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Assuming I have some array in heap doesn't matter constructed by malloc or new. I need the most efficient way to enlarge it. I mean if it has enough free space which lying after already allocated data can I keep my data untouched. Is it possible to maintain in C++?

Does realloc work in such manner?

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Yes, at least in most implementations, realloc will attempt to enlarge the current allocation rather than allocating a new block of memory and copying to it. new provides no analog to this (i.e., no way to even ask it to enlarge an allocation). –  Jerry Coffin Jul 24 '12 at 16:07
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Yes, realloc is what you are looking for. Note that it won't work with new, you will have to use malloc (or, say, calloc). Also, sometimes it is just impossible to extend memory, so realloc will try to do it for you, but if it couldn't — it will resort to allocating new memory, copying your contents to a new place and freeing the old memory.

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You answer on my question even better than i defined it –  triclosan Jul 24 '12 at 18:51
    
It's strange and pity that modern C++-style memory management not provides desired features. –  triclosan Jul 24 '12 at 20:07
    
@triclosan: If you go down to physical & virtual memory details you will see why this is sometimes impossible. It has nothing to do with C++ — it is how hardware works. You just cannot jump over your head, that's all. –  user405725 Jul 24 '12 at 20:09
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yes, realloc works like that, though the link says that it is not guaranteed, I think this is for cases where memory is fragmented and there is not enough room to expand the memory block in-situ.

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