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What is the best way of doing case insensitive string comparison in C++ with out transforming a string to all upper or lower case?

Also, what ever methods you present, are they Unicode friendly? Are they portable?

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I think a better question would be why are you trying to do a case insensitive comparison with a character encoding that could have different semantics for capitalization? –  Mat Noguchi Aug 18 '08 at 15:52
    
@[Adam](#11679): While this variant is good in terms of usability it's bad in terms of performance because it creates unnecessary copies. I might overlook something but I believe the best (non-Unicode) way is to use std::stricmp. Otherwise, read what Herb has to say. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 26 '08 at 12:17
    
In c, one usually was forced toupper the whole string then compare that way - or roll your own compare :P –  Michael Dorgan May 22 '10 at 1:10
1  
@James McNellis: Are you aware you are linking to this question? –  Vortico Aug 10 '11 at 6:28
    
@Vortico: Thanks for the heads-up; I've removed the comment. That comment was made on another question that was subsequently merged into this one (see the post history for details). –  James McNellis Aug 10 '11 at 16:14

20 Answers 20

up vote 183 down vote accepted

Boost includes a handy algorithm for this:

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>
// Or, for fewer header dependencies:
//#include <boost/algorithm/string/predicate.hpp>

std::string str1 = "hello, world!";
std::string str2 = "HELLO, WORLD!";

if (boost::iequals(str1, str2))
{
    // Strings are identical
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Is this UTF-8 friendly? I think not. –  vladr Oct 30 '10 at 0:23
6  
No, because UTF-8 allows identical strings to be coded with different binary codes, due to accents, combines, bidi issues, etc. –  vy32 Jun 18 '11 at 23:35
5  
@vy32 That is absolutely incorrect! The UTF-8 combinations are mutually exclusive. It must always use shortest possible representation, if it does not, it's a malformed UTF-8 sequence or code point that must be treated with care. –  Wiz Nov 10 '11 at 23:44
14  
@Wiz, you are ignoring the issue of Unicode string normalization. ñ can be represented as a combining ˜ followed by an n, or with a ñ character. You need to use Unicode string normalization before performing the comparaison. Please review Unicode Technical Report #15, unicode.org/reports/tr15 –  vy32 Nov 11 '11 at 3:21
4  
@vy32 (I never followed back on that comment) but that still doesn't mean it's not UTF-8 friendly. Comparison should undergo normalization to either fully decomposed or fully composed to eliminate such equivalence issues. Nevertheless, nothing stops that iequals function from doing that. –  Wiz Jan 22 '12 at 22:36

Take advantage of the standard char_traits. Recall that a std::string is in fact a typedef for std::basic_string<char>, or more explicitly, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char> >. The char_traits type describes how characters compare, how they copy, how they cast etc. All you need to do is typedef a new string over basic_string, and provide it with your own custom char_traits that compare case insensitively.

struct ci_char_traits : public char_traits<char> {
    static bool eq(char c1, char c2) { return toupper(c1) == toupper(c2); }
    static bool ne(char c1, char c2) { return toupper(c1) != toupper(c2); }
    static bool lt(char c1, char c2) { return toupper(c1) <  toupper(c2); }
    static int compare(const char* s1, const char* s2, size_t n) {
        while( n-- != 0 ) {
            if( toupper(*s1) < toupper(*s2) ) return -1;
            if( toupper(*s1) > toupper(*s2) ) return 1;
            ++s1; ++s2;
        }
        return 0;
    }
    static const char* find(const char* s, int n, char a) {
        while( n-- > 0 && toupper(*s) != toupper(a) ) {
            ++s;
        }
        return s;
    }
};

typedef std::basic_string<char, ci_char_traits> ci_string;

The details are on Guru of The Week number 29.

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2  
As far as I know from my own experimentation, this makes your new string type incompatible with std::string. –  Zan Lynx Sep 26 '12 at 21:25
2  
Of course it does - for its own good. A case-insensitive string is something else: typedef std::basic_string<char, ci_char_traits<char> > istring, not typedef std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char> > string. –  Andreas Spindler Oct 9 '12 at 9:24
1  
I know this is copied directly from GotW29, and I'd assume something this widely quoted was correct, but for me (on Visual Studio 2005) the find function here doesn't work. It causes the basic_string::find to overrun the buffer and crash. I had to change "return s;" to "return (n >= 0 ? s : NULL);". –  njplumridge Mar 28 '13 at 11:47
31  
"All you need to do..." –  Tim MB Apr 19 '13 at 10:03
    
The compare() method calls toupper() twice for each character. Probably should buffer the result of toupper() to reduce CPU impact. –  Nathan Feb 12 at 23:30

Are you talking about a dumb case insensitive compare or a full normalized Unicode compare?

A dumb compare will not find strings that might be the same but are not binary equal.

Example:

U212B (ANGSTROM SIGN)
U0041 (LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A) + U030A (COMBINING RING ABOVE)
U00C5 (LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH RING ABOVE).

Are all equivalent but they also have different binary representations.

That said, Unicode Normalization should be a mandatory read especially if you plan on supporting Hangul, Thaï and other asian languages.

Also, IBM pretty much patented most optimized Unicode algorithms and made them publicly available. They also maintain an implementation : IBM ICU

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If you are on a POSIX system, you can use strcasecmp. This function is not part of standard C, though, nor is it available on Windows. This will perform a case-insensitive comparison on 8-bit chars, so long as the locale is POSIX. If the locale is not POSIX, the results are undefined (so it might do a localized compare, or it might not). A wide-character equivalent is not available.

On Windows, you can use the _stricmp or _wcsicmp functions to perform case-insensitive comparison. These function do use the current locale information, and the wide-character version is available. However, these are obviously Windows-specific.

C and C++ are both largely ignorant of internationalization issues, so there's no good solution to this problem, except to use a third-party library. Check out IBM ICU (International Components for Unicode) if you need a robust library for C/C++. ICU is for both Windows and Unix systems.

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The trouble with boost is that you have to link with and depend on boost. Not easy in some cases (e.g. android).

And using char_traits means all your comparisons are case insensitive, which isn't usually what you want.

This should suffice. It should be reasonably efficient. Doesn't handle unicode or anything though.

bool iequals(const string& a, const string& b)
{
    unsigned int sz = a.size();
    if (b.size() != sz)
        return false;
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < sz; ++i)
        if (tolower(a[i]) != tolower(b[i]))
            return false;
    return true;
}
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13  
Actually, the boost string library is a header only library, so there is no need to link to anything. Also, you can use boost's 'bcp' utility to copy just the string headers to your source tree, so you don't need to require the full boost library. –  Anna Mar 9 '11 at 21:47
    
Ah I did not know about bcp, it looks really useful. Thanks for the info! –  Timmmm Mar 13 '11 at 18:15
    
Good to know a simple and non-boost-dependency version. –  Deqing May 17 at 3:31

My first thought for a non-unicode version was to do something like this:


bool caseInsensitiveStringCompare(const string& str1, const string& str2) {
    if (str1.size() != str2.size()) {
        return false;
    }
    for (string::const_iterator c1 = str1.begin(), c2 = str2.begin(); c1 != str1.end(); ++c1, ++c2) {
        if (tolower(*c1) != tolower(*c2)) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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The Boost.String library has a lot of algorithms for doing case-insenstive comparisons and so on.

You could implement your own, but why bother when it's already been done?

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There isn't a way built-in with std::string? –  WilliamKF May 22 '10 at 0:58
2  
No, there isn't. –  Dean Harding May 22 '10 at 1:06

boost::iequals is not utf-8 compatible in the case of string. You can use boost::locale.

comparator<char,collator_base::secondary> cmpr;
cout << (cmpr(str1, str2) ? "str1 < str2" : "str1 >= str2") << endl;
  • Primary -- ignore accents and character case, comparing base letters only. For example "facade" and "Façade" are the same.
  • Secondary -- ignore character case but consider accents. "facade" and "façade" are different but "Façade" and "façade" are the same.
  • Tertiary -- consider both case and accents: "Façade" and "façade" are different. Ignore punctuation.
  • Quaternary -- consider all case, accents, and punctuation. The words must be identical in terms of Unicode representation.
  • Identical -- as quaternary, but compare code points as well.
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finally, a solution without ponies –  Dmitry Ledentsov Aug 19 at 10:19

Visual C++ string functions supporting unicode: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc194799.aspx

the one you are probably looking for is _wcsnicmp

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2  
Ironically, Microsoft's "wide character codes" are NOT unicode clean because they do not handle unicode normalization. –  vy32 Jun 18 '11 at 23:36

I'm trying to cobble together a good answer from all the posts, so help me edit this:

Here is a method of doing this, although it does transforming the strings, and is not Unicode friendly, it should be portable which is a plus:

bool caseInsensitiveStringCompare( const std::string& str1, const std::string& str2 ) {
    std::string str1Cpy( str1 );
    std::string str2Cpy( str2 );
    std::transform( str1Cpy.begin(), str1Cpy.end(), str1Cpy.begin(), ::tolower );
    std::transform( str2Cpy.begin(), str2Cpy.end(), str2Cpy.begin(), ::tolower );
    return ( str1Cpy == str2Cpy );
}

From what I have read this is more portable than stricmp() because stricmp() is not in fact part of the std library, but only implemented by most compiler vendors.

To get a truly Unicode friendly implementation it appears you must go outside the std library. One good 3rd party library is the IBM ICU (International Components for Unicode)

Also boost::iequals provides a fairly good utility for doing this sort of comparison.

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can you please tell, what does mean ::tolower, why you can use tolower instead of tolower(), and what is '::' before? thanks –  VextoR Mar 11 '11 at 8:40
9  
This is not a very efficient solution - you make copies of both strings and transform all of them even if the first character is different. –  Timmmm Mar 13 '11 at 18:14

You can use strcasecmp on Unix, or stricmp on Windows.

One thing that hasn't been mentioned so far is that if you are using stl strings with these methods, it's useful to first compare the length of the two strings, since this information is already available to you in the string class. This could prevent doing the costly string comparison if the two strings you are comparing aren't even the same length in the first place.

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Since determining the length of a string consists of iterating over every character in the string and comparing it against 0, is there really that much difference between that and just comparing the strings right away? I guess you get better memory locality in the case where both strings don't match, but probably nearly 2x runtime in case of a match. –  uliwitness Jan 22 at 13:28
1  
C++11 specifies that the complexity of std::string::length must be constant: cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/length –  bradtgmurray Feb 4 at 21:37
1  
That's a fun little fact, but has little bearing here. strcasecmp() and stricmp() both take undecorated C strings, so there is no std::string involved. –  uliwitness Feb 5 at 17:39
2  
These methods will return -1 if you compare "a" vs "ab". The lengths are different but "a" comes before "ab". So, simply comparing the lengths is not feasible if the caller cares about ordering. –  Nathan Feb 12 at 23:33

FYI, strcmp() and stricmp() are vulnerable to buffer overflow, since they just process until they hit a null terminator. It's safer to use _strncmp() and _strnicmp().

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4  
True, although overREADing a buffer is significantly less dangerous than overWRITEing a buffer. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 17 '08 at 20:47
2  
stricmp() and strnicmp() are not part of the POSIX standard :-( However you can find strcasecmp(), strcasecmp_l(), strncasecmp() and strncasecmp_l() in POSIX header strings.h :-) see opengroup.org –  olibre Apr 11 '13 at 12:27

Assuming you are looking for a method and not a magic function that already exists, there is frankly no better way. We could all write code snippets with clever tricks for limited character sets, but at the end of the day at somepoint you have to convert the characters.

The best approach for this conversion is to do so prior to the comparison. This allows you a good deal of flexibility when it comes to encoding schemes, which your actual comparison operator should be ignorant of.

You can of course 'hide' this conversion behind your own string function or class, but you still need to convert the strings prior to comparison.

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I wrote a case-insensitive version of char_traits for use with std::basic_string in order to generate a std::string that is not case-sensitive when doing comparisons, searches, etc using the built-in std::basic_string member functions.

So in other words, I wanted to do something like this.

std::string a = "Hello, World!";
std::string b = "hello, world!";

assert( a == b );

...which std::string can't handle. Here's the usage of my new char_traits:

std::istring a = "Hello, World!";
std::istring b = "hello, world!";

assert( a == b );

...and here's the implementation:

/*  ---

    	Case-Insensitive char_traits for std::string's

    	Use:

    		To declare a std::string which preserves case but ignores case in comparisons & search,
    		use the following syntax:

    			std::basic_string<char, char_traits_nocase<char> > noCaseString;

    		A typedef is declared below which simplifies this use for chars:

    			typedef std::basic_string<char, char_traits_nocase<char> > istring;

    ---	*/

    template<class C>
    struct char_traits_nocase : public std::char_traits<C>
    {
    	static bool eq( const C& c1, const C& c2 )
    	{ 
    		return ::toupper(c1) == ::toupper(c2); 
    	}

    	static bool lt( const C& c1, const C& c2 )
    	{ 
    		return ::toupper(c1) < ::toupper(c2);
    	}

    	static int compare( const C* s1, const C* s2, size_t N )
    	{
    		return _strnicmp(s1, s2, N);
    	}

    	static const char* find( const C* s, size_t N, const C& a )
        {
    		for( size_t i=0 ; i<N ; ++i )
    		{
    			if( ::toupper(s[i]) == ::toupper(a) ) 
    				return s+i ;
    		}
    		return 0 ;
    	}

    	static bool eq_int_type( const int_type& c1, const int_type& c2 )
    	{ 
    		return ::toupper(c1) == ::toupper(c2) ; 
    	}		
    };

    template<>
    struct char_traits_nocase<wchar_t> : public std::char_traits<wchar_t>
    {
    	static bool eq( const wchar_t& c1, const wchar_t& c2 )
    	{ 
    		return ::towupper(c1) == ::towupper(c2); 
    	}

    	static bool lt( const wchar_t& c1, const wchar_t& c2 )
    	{ 
    		return ::towupper(c1) < ::towupper(c2);
    	}

    	static int compare( const wchar_t* s1, const wchar_t* s2, size_t N )
    	{
    		return _wcsnicmp(s1, s2, N);
    	}

    	static const wchar_t* find( const wchar_t* s, size_t N, const wchar_t& a )
        {
    		for( size_t i=0 ; i<N ; ++i )
    		{
    			if( ::towupper(s[i]) == ::towupper(a) ) 
    				return s+i ;
    		}
    		return 0 ;
    	}

    	static bool eq_int_type( const int_type& c1, const int_type& c2 )
    	{ 
    		return ::towupper(c1) == ::towupper(c2) ; 
    	}		
    };

    typedef std::basic_string<char, char_traits_nocase<char> > istring;
    typedef std::basic_string<wchar_t, char_traits_nocase<wchar_t> > iwstring;
share|improve this answer
    
This works for regular chars, but won't work for all of Unicode, as captitalization is not necessarily bidirectional (there's a good example in Greek involving sigma that I can't remember right now; something like it has two lower and one upper case, and you can't get a proper comparison either way) –  coppro Nov 24 '08 at 21:02
    
That's really the wrong way to go about it. Case sensitivity should not be a property of the strings themselves. What happens when the same string object needs both case-sensitive and case insensitive comparisons? –  Ferruccio Nov 24 '08 at 21:07
    
If case-sensitivity isn't appropriate to be "part of" the string, then neither is the find() function at all. Which, for you, might be true, and that's fine. IMO the greatest thing about C++ is that it doesn't force a particular paradigm on the programmer. It is what you want/need it to be. –  John Dibling Nov 25 '08 at 6:20
    
Actually, I think most C++-guru's (like the ones on the standards committee) agree that it was a mistake to put find() in std::basic_string<> along with a whole lot of other things that could equally well be placed in free functions. Besides there are some issues with putting it in the type. –  Andreas Magnusson Nov 25 '08 at 7:50
    
As others have pointed out, there are two major things wrong with this solution (ironically, one is the interface and the other is the implementation ;-)). –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 25 '08 at 8:15

I've had good experience using the International Components for Unicode libraries - they're extremely powerful, and provide methods for conversion, locale support, date and time rendering, case mapping (which you don't seem to want), and collation, which includes case- and accent-insensitive comparison (and more). I've only used the C++ version of the libraries, but they appear to have a Java version as well.

Methods exist to perform normalized compares as referred to by @Coincoin, and can even account for locale - for example (and this a sorting example, not strictly equality), traditionally in Spanish (in Spain), the letter combination "ll" sorts between "l" and "m", so "lz" < "ll" < "ma".

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For my basic case insensitive string comparison needs I prefer not to have to use an external library, nor do I want a separate string class with case insensitive traits that is incompatible with all my other strings.

So what I've come up with is this:

bool icasecmp(const string& l, const string& r)
{
    return l.size() == r.size()
        && equal(l.cbegin(), l.cend(), r.cbegin(),
            [](string::value_type l1, string::value_type r1)
                { return toupper(l1) == toupper(r1); });
}

bool icasecmp(const wstring& l, const wstring& r)
{
    return l.size() == r.size()
        && equal(l.cbegin(), l.cend(), r.cbegin(),
            [](wstring::value_type l1, wstring::value_type r1)
                { return towupper(l1) == towupper(r1); });
}

A simple function with one overload for char and another for whar_t. Doesn't use anything non-standard so should be fine on any platform.

The equality comparison won't consider issues like variable length encoding and Unicode normalization, but basic_string has no support for that that I'm aware of anyway and it isn't normally an issue.

In cases where more sophisticated lexicographical manipulation of text is required, then you simply have to use a third party library like Boost, which is to be expected.

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1  
You could probably make that one function if you made it a template and used basic_string<T> instead of separate string/wstring versions? –  uliwitness Jan 22 at 13:31

Just a note on whatever method you finally choose, if that method happens to include the use of strcmp that some answers suggest:

strcmp doesn't work with Unicode data in general. In general, it doesn't even work with byte-based Unicode encodings, such as utf-8, since strcmp only makes byte-per-byte comparisons and Unicode code points encoded in utf-8 can take more than 1 byte. The only specific Unicode case strcmp properly handle is when a string encoded with a byte-based encoding contains only code points below U+00FF - then the byte-per-byte comparison is enough.

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As of early 2013, the ICU project, maintained by IBM, is a pretty good answer to this.

http://site.icu-project.org/

ICU is a "complete, portable Unicode library that closely tracks industry standards." For the specific problem of string comparison, the Collation object does what you want.

The Mozilla Project adopted ICU for internationalization in Firefox in mid-2012; you can track the engineering discussion, including issues of build systems and data file size, here:

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Just use strcmp() for case sensitive and strcmpi() or stricmp() for case insensitive comparison. Which are both in the header file <string.h>

format:

int strcmp(const char*,const char*);    //for case sensitive
int strcmpi(const char*,const char*);   //for case insensitive

Usage:

string a="apple",b="ApPlE",c="ball";
if(strcmpi(a.c_str(),b.c_str())==0)      //(if it is a match it will return 0)
    cout<<a<<" and "<<b<<" are the same"<<"\n";
if(strcmpi(a.c_str(),b.c_str()<0)
    cout<<a[0]<<" comes before ball "<<b[0]<<", so "<<a<<" comes before "<<b;

Output

apple and ApPlE are the same

a comes before b, so apple comes before ball

share|improve this answer
2  
Downvote because this is hardly a C++ way of doing things. –  Thomas Daugaard Jul 30 '13 at 9:09
    
This is the c++ convention at my university but i will keep it in mind when posting here –  reubenjohn Aug 13 '13 at 18:04
1  
stricmp is a Microsoft extension AFAIK. BSD seems to have strcasecmp() instead. –  uliwitness Jan 22 at 13:30

If you have a vector of strings, for example:

std::sort(std::begin(myvector), std::end(myvector), [](std::string const &a, std::string const &b)
{
    return std::lexicographical_compare(std::begin(a), std::end(a), std::begin(b), std::end(b), [](std::string::value_type a, std::string::value_type b)
    {
        return std::tolower(a) < std::tolower(b); //case-insensitive
    });
});

http://ideone.com/N6sq6X

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