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I want to write some C code that has the following requirement:

  1. Repeated fork exec.
  2. The fork'ed process should use a large amount of memory and then either give it up or just die or I would just kill it.

Any ideas?

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closed as not constructive by pb2q, ecatmur, Basile Starynkevitch, Vlad Lazarenko, dsolimano Jul 25 '12 at 3:12

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What?? Weird homework? Or you have some other purpose? What have you tried? –  lvella Jul 24 '12 at 16:53
    
@Ivella this is not a homework. Haven't tried anything yet. I was just going to. I will post my code. –  abc Jul 24 '12 at 17:41
    
For what purpose do you need this? We might be able to provide a better solution if we knew the actual problem... –  thkala Jul 24 '12 at 17:53
    
@thkala I am trying to test an older linux kernel 2.6.31 to test if the fork exec mechanism is stable enough. The problem is we cannot switch to a newer kernel and have to work with this version only. We have been seeing some weird things happening recently and the suspicion is that some fork exec patch might be required to fix some of the problems. –  abc Jul 24 '12 at 17:55
1  
Uh, I don't want to sound condescending, but it's unlikely that any weird things that you are seeing are due to a bug to the fork/exec mechanism in the Linux kernel - that is one of the most heavily exercised subsystems... –  thkala Jul 24 '12 at 18:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    unsigned long long bytes;
    char bytes_str[32];
    void *buf;
    int i;
    if (argc < 2) {
        fprintf(stderr, "usage: %s [megabytes]\n", argv[0]);
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    } else if (argc < 3) {
        switch (fork()) {
        case 0:  break;
        case -1: perror("fork");
                 exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        default: exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
        }
        bytes = strtoull(argv[1], 0, 0) * 1024 * 1024;
        snprintf(bytes_str, sizeof(bytes_str), "%llu", bytes);
        if (execlp(argv[0], argv[0], "child", bytes_str, (char *)0) != 0) {
            perror("execlp");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        /* NOT REACHED */
    } else {
        bytes = strtoull(argv[2], 0, 0);
    }
    if (bytes < 1024*1024) exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    buf = malloc(bytes);
    if (buf == 0) {
        perror("malloc");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    memset(buf, '\xff', bytes);
    free(buf);
    bytes /= 2;
    snprintf(bytes_str, sizeof(bytes_str), "%llu", bytes);
    for (i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
        switch (fork()) {
        case 0:  break;
        case -1: perror("fork");
                 exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        default: continue;
        }
        if (execlp(argv[0], argv[0], "child", bytes_str, (char *)0) != 0) {
            perror("execlp");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        /* NOT REACHED */
    }
    return 0;
}
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