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I implement IXmlSerializable for the type below which encodes a RGB color value as a single string:

public class SerializableColor : IXmlSerializable
{
    public int R { get; set; }
    public int G { get; set; }
    public int B { get; set; }

    public XmlSchema GetSchema()
    {
        return null;
    }

    public void ReadXml(XmlReader reader)
    {
        var data = reader.ReadString();
        reader.ReadEndElement();
        var split = data.Split(' ');
        R = int.Parse(split[0]);
        G = int.Parse(split[1]);
        B = int.Parse(split[2]);
    }

    public void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        writer.WriteString(R + " " + G + " " + B);
    }
}

Since it's a single string, I wanted to store it as an attribute to save space. But as soon as I add the [XmlAttribute] to my property, I get the following exception:

{"Cannot serialize member 'Color' of type SerializableColor. XmlAttribute/XmlText cannot be used to encode types implementing IXmlSerializable."}

Is there a way to make it work as an attribute too?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The error means exactly what it says. You cannot use these XML serialization attributes when IXmlSerializable is implemented because IXmlSerializable expects the XML serialization to be completely customized. You can do this if you want to make the class serializable with XmlSerializer using the attributes.

[XmlRoot("SerializableColor")]
public class SerializableColor
{
    [XmlAttribute("R")]
    public int R { get; set; }
    [XmlAttribute("G")]
    public int R { get; set; }
    [XmlAttribute("B")]
    public int B { get; set; }    
}

Also, for your implementation of XmlSerializable:

    public void ReadXml(XmlReader reader)
    {
        string data = null;

        reader.MoveToAttribute("Color");
        if (reader.ReadAttributeValue())
        {
            data = reader.Value;
        }
        reader.ReadEndElement();

        var split = data.Split(' ');
        R = int.Parse(split[0]);
        G = int.Parse(split[1]);
        B = int.Parse(split[2]);
    }

    public void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        writer.WriteAttributeString("Color", R + " " + G + " " + B);
    }

If, on the other hand, all you are looking to be able to do is have a short string represenation of a color that is reversible, have a look at the ColorTranslator Class. In particular, see the FromHtml and ToHtml methods.

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Thank you for your answer. I have two questions though. First, how is the implementation not correct? Looks pretty much like the example given in the documentation (with the adendum described in the comment section). And second, is the XmlRoot attribute relevant in the example? What differences does it make? –  David Gouveia Jul 24 '12 at 19:33
    
Regarding the implementation not producing correct XML, I had forgotten that "The framework writes a wrapper element and positions the XML writer after its start." I'll revise the answer. You could actually leave the XmlRoot out as it can be inferred by the XmlSerializer, however, when I override the default serialization behavior on a class, I usually do it on all the components of it for clarity. –  JamieSee Jul 24 '12 at 20:24
    
I down voted because OP is asking who to create an customisable XML attribute. NOT producing a an XML element. –  Richard Schneider Oct 3 '12 at 8:44
    
Funny @RichardSchneider as the person asking the question found this to be acceptable as an answer and both sets of code in it do in fact produce an attribute in the XML, your downvote makes no sense. Perhaps you should give this another read and maybe try executing the code. –  JamieSee Oct 4 '12 at 14:50

Sadly (& strangely) it is not possible according to this link http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/277641/xmlattribute-xmltext-cannot-be-used-to-encode-types-implementing-ixmlserializable

To work-around the problem, I am currently using the XmlIgnore attribute to hide the complex property and expose it as a string via another property

public class MyDto
{
    [XmlAttribute(AttributeName = "complex-attribute")]
    public string MyComplexPropertyAsString
    {
        get { return MyComplexMember.ToString(); }
        set { MyComplexMember.LoadFromString(value); }
    }
    [XmlIgnore]
    public MyComplexMember At { get; set; }
}
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