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I have this code that gets called from an injected DLL from a foreign process. It sould read some memory ranges but I sometimes get a segmentation fault at this line DataBuffer := TCharPointer(Address + CharOffset)^;. So is there any way to check if the memory is readable?

function GetCurrentData(Address: Pointer): PChar;
var
  DataBuffer: Char;
  CharArray: Array of Char;
  CharOffset: Integer;
  ReadBytes: longword;
begin
  CharOffset := 0;
  SetLength(CharArray, 0);
  repeat
    DataBuffer := TCharPointer(Address + CharOffset)^;
    CharOffset := CharOffset + 1;
    SetLength(CharArray, CharOffset);
    CharArray[CharOffset - 1] := DataBuffer;
  until (Ord(DataBuffer) = 0);
  Result := PChar(@CharArray[0]);
end;

i also tryed to catch the exception but for some reason this is not working. The host programm still crashes.

unit UnitEventBridgeExports;

{$mode objfpc}{$H+}

interface

uses
  Classes, SysUtils, Windows, ShellAPI, JwaTlHelp32, SimpleIPC;

type
  TCharPointer = ^Char;

const
  WOWEXE = 'TestProgramm.exe';

var
  IPCClient: TSimpleIPCClient;
  PID: DWord;
  Process: THandle;

procedure EventCalled;
procedure InitializeWoWEventBridge; stdcall;

implementation


function GetProcessIDByName(Exename: String): DWord;
var
  hProcSnap: THandle;
  pe32: TProcessEntry32;
begin
  Result := 0;
  hProcSnap := CreateToolHelp32SnapShot(TH32CS_SNAPPROCESS, 0);
  if hProcSnap <> INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE then
  begin
    pe32.dwSize := SizeOf(ProcessEntry32);
    if Process32First(hProcSnap, pe32) = True then
    begin
      while Process32Next(hProcSnap, pe32) = True do
      begin
        if pos(Exename, pe32.szExeFile) <> 0 then
          Result := pe32.th32ProcessID;
      end;
    end;
    CloseHandle(hProcSnap);
  end;
end;


procedure InitializeEventBridge; stdcall;
begin
  IPCClient := TSimpleIPCClient.Create(nil);
  IPCClient.ServerID := 'EventBridgeServer';
  IPCClient.Active := True;
  IPCClient.SendStringMessage('init');
  PID := GetProcessIDByName(EXE);
  Process := OpenProcess(PROCESS_ALL_ACCESS, False, PID);
end;


function GetCurrentData(Address: Pointer): PChar;
var
  DataBuffer: Char;
  CharArray: Array of Char;
  CharOffset: Integer;
  ReadBytes: longword;
  CharPointer: TCharPointer;
  BreakLoop: Boolean;
begin
  CharOffset := 0;
  SetLength(CharArray, 0);
  BreakLoop := False;
  repeat
    try
      CharPointer := TCharPointer(Address + CharOffset);
      DataBuffer := CharPointer^;
      CharOffset := CharOffset + 1;
      SetLength(CharArray, CharOffset);
      CharArray[CharOffset - 1] := DataBuffer;
    except
      BreakLoop := True;
    end;
  until (Ord(DataBuffer) = 0) or BreakLoop;
  Result := PChar(@CharArray[0]);
end;


procedure EventCalled;
var
  TmpAddress: Pointer;
  StringData: PChar;
begin
  {$ASMMODE intel}
  asm
    mov [TmpAddress], edi
  end;
  StringData := GetCurrentData(TmpAddress);
  IPCClient.SendStringMessage('update:' + StringData);
  //IPCClient.SendStringMessage('update');
end;

end.
share|improve this question
    
why don't you just catch the exception? –  David Heffernan Jul 24 '12 at 17:24
    
You're doing it wrong. Find out which ranges of memory are the ones you want, and then read only those ranges. Don't go poking around in memory you're not familiar with. –  Rob Kennedy Jul 24 '12 at 17:34
    
@DavidHeffernan see the edit. –  Maximilian Ruta Jul 24 '12 at 17:38
    
the try..finally block is not doing anything in the finally part –  Blobby Jul 24 '12 at 17:38
1  
You're not trying to catch the exception at all. Try..finally is not an exception handler. Use try..except for exceptions, and actually handle the exception; if you're doing nothing, don't catch it at all. –  Ken White Jul 24 '12 at 17:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your GetCurrentData() implementation is returning a pointer to a local array that goees out of scope when the function exits, then EventCalled() tries to use that poiner after it is no longer valid. Try this instead:

function GetCurrentData(Address: Pointer): AnsiString; 
var 
  Offset: Integer; 
begin 
  Result := '';
  Offset := 0; 
  repeat 
    try 
      if PByte(Longint(Address) + Offset)^ = #0 then Break;
      Inc(Offset); 
    except 
      Break; 
    end; 
  until False; 
  SetString(Result, PAnsiChar(Address), Offset); 
end; 

procedure EventCalled; 
var 
  TmpAddress: Pointer; 
  StringData: AnsiString; 
begin 
  {$ASMMODE intel} 
  asm 
    mov [TmpAddress], edi 
  end; 
  StringData := GetCurrentData(TmpAddress); 
  IPCClient.SendStringMessage('update:' + StringData); 
  //IPCClient.SendStringMessage('update'); 
end; 
share|improve this answer
    
Oh. I thought that PChar is an datatype and not a pointer. I could test you code when i am back home tomorrow –  Maximilian Ruta Jul 25 '12 at 10:31
    
PChar is a pointer to a Char. –  Remy Lebeau Jul 25 '12 at 19:42

IsBadReadPtr API is here to help. You give address and size, and you get the readability back. Raymond Chen suggests to never use it though.

Other than that, VirtualQuery should give you information about the address in question to tell its readability.

Since Ken in comments below re-warned about danger of IsBadReadPtr, I bring it up to the answer to not pass by. Be sure to read the comments and links to Raymdond's blog. Be sure to see also:

share|improve this answer
1  
IsBadReadPtr is bad, and you shouldn't use it. See Raymond Chen's blog posts here and here for reasons why this is the case. –  Ken White Jul 24 '12 at 17:06
1  
True, and I mentioned it, however we don't know the purpose, and for debugging reasons IsBadReadPtr is just fine. –  Roman R. Jul 24 '12 at 17:08
    
No, it isn't. Read the two posts I linked to for reasons why, as I said. –  Ken White Jul 24 '12 at 17:10
    
Raymond's warning is about "You just blew your one chance." and this instructs to stay away from this API. On debugging scenarios you might want to not care about second chance, and the API is readily available for you to hit an exception and bring up the problem. Now why not use it? It is all here at one's fingertips. –  Roman R. Jul 24 '12 at 17:16
    
I gave you two separate links, both of which say "Don't use this function" and written by a long time MS employee on the Shell team (who is extremely knowledgeable, BTW), the API documentation itself says "You shouldn't use this function", and you still insist on advising to use the function? Sorry; I have to disagree. The fact that there's a saw available doesn't automatically mean you should use it to cut off your arms and legs. The "one chance" is important, and the post explains exactly why; it doesn't matter if it's for debugging or not, the fact you used the function breaks it's validity –  Ken White Jul 24 '12 at 17:41

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