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The SO Question has lead me to the following question.

If a table has 16 rows I'd like to add a field to the table with the numbers 1,2,3,4,5,...,16 arranged randomly i.e in the 'RndVal' field for row 1 this could be 2, then for row 2 it could be 5 i.e each of the 16 integers needs to appear once without repetition.

Why doesn't the following work? Ideally I'd like to see this working then to see alternative solutions.

This creates the table ok:

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#A') IS NOT NULL BEGIN DROP TABLE #A END
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#B') IS NOT NULL BEGIN DROP TABLE #B END
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#C') IS NOT NULL BEGIN DROP TABLE #C END
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#myTable') IS NOT NULL BEGIN DROP TABLE #myTable END

CREATE TABLE #B (B_ID INT)
CREATE TABLE #C (C_ID INT)

INSERT INTO #B(B_ID) VALUES
    (10),
    (20),
    (30),
    (40)
INSERT INTO #C(C_ID)VALUES
    (1),
    (2),
    (3),
    (4)

CREATE TABLE #A 
    (
    B_ID INT
    , C_ID INT
    , RndVal INT
    )

INSERT INTO #A(B_ID, C_ID, RndVal)  
SELECT 
        #B.B_ID
        , #C.C_ID
        , 0 
FROM #B CROSS JOIN #C; 

Then I'm attempting to add the random column using the following. The logic is to add random numbers between 1 and 16 > then to effectively overwrite any that are duplicated with other numbers > in a loop ...

SELECT 
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY B_ID) AS Row
    , B_ID
    , C_ID
    , RndVal
INTO #myTable
FROM #A

DECLARE @rowsRequired INT = (SELECT COUNT(*) CNT FROM #myTable)
DECLARE @i INT = (SELECT @rowsRequired - SUM(CASE WHEN RndVal > 0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) FROM #myTable)--0


DECLARE @end INT = 1
WHILE @end > 0 
    BEGIN

            SELECT @i = @rowsRequired -  SUM(CASE WHEN RndVal > 0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) FROM #myTable
            WHILE @i>0
                BEGIN

                    UPDATE x
                    SET x.RndVal = FLOOR(RAND()*@rowsRequired)
                    FROM #myTable x
                    WHERE x.RndVal = 0 

                    SET @i = @i-1
                END 

         --this is to remove possible duplicates
            UPDATE c 
            SET c.RndVal = 0 
            FROM 
                #myTable c
                INNER JOIN 
                    (
                    SELECT RndVal
                    FROM #myTable
                    GROUP BY RndVal 
                    HAVING COUNT(RndVal)>1
                    ) t
                    ON 
                        c.RndVal = t.RndVal

         SET @end = @@ROWCOUNT

    END

TRUNCATE TABLE #A
INSERT INTO #A
SELECT 
    B_ID
    , C_ID
    , RndVal
FROM #myTable

If the original table has 6 rows then the result should end up something like this

B_ID|C_ID|RndVal
----------------
    |    | 5 
    |    | 4
    |    | 1
    |    | 6
    |    | 3
    |    | 2
share|improve this question
2  
I'm confused by the logic, and don't want to try to reverse engineer. In the case where you want exactly 16 rows, can you show what an acceptable result might look like? I'm confident there is a much simpler way to accomplish this... – Aaron Bertrand Jul 24 '12 at 17:41
    
@AaronBertrand just getting back to this question now: looks like Nikola has edited my attempt (will test tomorrow) and gbn has created alternatives - his interpretation of what I'm trying to achieve is correct. Always happy to read your method though if you have another version of the answer – whytheq Jul 24 '12 at 19:35
    
as I said, if you post actual desired results, I'll give it a shot. If the only way I'm interested in figuring out what you're after is to look at the other answers... – Aaron Bertrand Jul 24 '12 at 19:36
    
just added it now; I've left out the results of the cross join; ...if the cross join resulted in 20 rows then the rnd column would contain the numbers 1,2,3,4,...20 in a random sequence. – whytheq Jul 24 '12 at 19:42
1  
looking closer I don't think I will come up with anything significantly different than the answers that have already been posted. I would have submitted an answer if you had shown your desired results from the start. – Aaron Bertrand Jul 24 '12 at 19:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't understand your code, frankly

This will update each row with a random number, non-repeated number between 1 and the number of rows in the table

UPDATE T
SET SomeCol = T2.X
FROM
   MyTable T
   JOIN
   (
   SELECT
      KeyCol, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY NEWID()) AS X
   FROM 
      MyTable
   ) T2 ON T.KeyCol = T2.KeyCol 

This is more concise but can't test to see if it works as expected

UPDATE T
SET SomeCol = X
FROM
   (
   SELECT
      SomeCol, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY NEWID()) AS X
   FROM 
      MyTable
   ) T
share|improve this answer
1  
very pretty code - cheers Shawn – whytheq Jul 25 '12 at 7:46
    
@whytheq: thank you. first time I've had that compliment :-) – gbn Jul 25 '12 at 9:35
    
I've not see so many langauges but compared to other languages sql is the prettiest. Might be a good question "What's the prettiest language?" for SO ... suspect it might get closed! – whytheq Jul 25 '12 at 11:07

When you add TOP (1) (because you need to update first RndVal=0 record) and +1 (because otherwise your zero mark means nothing) to your update, things will start to move. But extremely slowly (around 40 seconds on my rather outdated laptop). This is because, as #myTable gets filled with generated random numbers, it becomes less and less probable to get missing numbers - you usually get duplicate, and have to start again.

UPDATE top (1) x
SET x.RndVal = FLOOR(RAND()*@rowsRequired) + 1
FROM #myTable x
WHERE x.RndVal = 0 

Of course, @gbn has perfectly valid solution.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for fixing existing code; for 16 rows it runs in 1sec on my machine - I realise 16 rows should be instantaneous so will explore alternatives provided by Shawn – whytheq Jul 25 '12 at 7:43

This is basically the same as the previous answer, but specific to your code:

;WITH CTE As
(
    SELECT B_ID, C_ID, RndVal, 
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY NewID()) As NewOrder
    FROM #A
)

UPDATE  CTE
SET     RndVal = NewOrder

SELECT * FROM #A ORDER BY RndVal
share|improve this answer

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