Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following query:

SELECT COUNT(employees.id) AS emp_count 
FROM `orders` 
INNER JOIN `companies` ON `companies`.`id` = `orders`.`company_id` 
INNER JOIN employees ON employees.company_id = companies.id
  AND (employees.deleted_at >= companies.activate_at OR employees.deleted_at IS NULL)                       
  AND employees.created_at <= companies.activate_at 
WHERE 
  (companies.activate_at BETWEEN '2012-01-31 23:00:00' AND '2012-02-29 22:59:59'                    
   AND orders.type = 'Order::TrialActivation'
   AND orders.state = 'completed')

I need the SUM of all the "emp_count" columns. Currently I iterate over all the rows returned by above query, and then SUM on "emp_count" in Ruby. But there are many rows, so this takes up a lot of memory.

How would I SUM on "emp_count" in SQL and return just this number?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you taking other data? What I mean is: you get data AND you get that sum you are seeking for. How and where would it appear? –  Andrius Naruševičius Jul 24 '12 at 17:43
    
This was ambigious, removed from above. Thanks for pointing it out. –  skinkelynet Jul 24 '12 at 17:44
3  
I don't quite understand the question. This query anyway returns only one row with one column emp_count no? There is no GROUP BY or anything –  mask8 Jul 24 '12 at 17:50
    
You are right, mask8. Thank you. If you would answer the question, I'll approve it and close, so if somebody makes the same mistake, they'll figure it out. –  skinkelynet Jul 24 '12 at 18:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

--- Update: ---

Since the question has been updated, I'll update my answer:

If you are trying to just get the number of rows from your query based on the WHERE syntax, then you can use COUNT(). However, if you want the sum of all of the employees.id values from the query, then change COUNT(employees.id) to SUM(employees.id), and that should do what you want.

--- Original Answer ---

Try using a subquery, kinda like this (code not tested):

SELECT SUM(x.emp_count) FROM (
    SELECT COUNT(employees.id) AS emp_count 
    FROM `orders` 
    INNER JOIN `companies` ON `companies`.`id` = `orders`.`company_id` 
    INNER JOIN employees ON employees.company_id = companies.id
      AND (employees.deleted_at >= companies.activate_at OR employees.deleted_at IS NULL)                       
      AND employees.created_at <= companies.activate_at 
    WHERE 
      (companies.activate_at BETWEEN '2012-01-31 23:00:00' AND '2012-02-29 22:59:59'                    
       AND orders.type = 'Order::TrialActivation'
       AND orders.state = 'completed')
) x;

You can read more on subqueries in the MySQL documentation, and see also: How to SUM() multiple subquery rows in MySQL?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.