Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some JSON that looks like this. I have it stored and read into an object, @items.

[
 {
  {
    "id": "A",
    "description": "a_description"
  }, 
  {
    "id": "B",
    "description": "b_description"
  }
 }, 
 {
  {
    "id": "A",
    "description": "a_description"
  }, 
  {
    "id": "B",
    "description": "b_description"
  }
 }
] 

My goal is to display a table with two columns, one labeled A and the other labeled B, in which each row gives the "a_description" and "b_description". I'm not sure how to go about doing this.

share|improve this question
    
+1 for your username. And i didnt understand your question. Is the items array populated with this json? Or you have a json and you want to populate the items array? –  MurifoX Jul 24 '12 at 17:55
    
I have the json in a file. From what I understand, when I read in the JSON, I get the items array. –  rapidash Jul 24 '12 at 18:05
    
It looks like the first sublevel beneath the overall array should also be an array [] not a hash {} right? –  Ron Jul 24 '12 at 19:14
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ah, the ol' array of hashes and hashes of arrays problem.

To get around your "out of order" problem you first have to convert

{
  "id": "A",
  "description": "foo"
},
{
  "id": "B",
  "description": "bar"
}

into {"A" : "foo", "B" : "bar" }.

@new_items = @items.map do |item|
  output = {}
  item.each do |hash|
    output.merge!(hash["id"] => hash["description"])
  end
end

Then @new_items becomes (intentionally presented out of order since hash elements are not ordered)

[
  { 
    "A": "a1_description",
    "B": "b1_description"
  },
  { 
    "B": "b2_description",
    "A": "a2_description"
  }
]

From there, each line is simply a hash, so you can just dereference the value you need based on the column you're in.

@new_items.each do |item|
  puts "#{item['A']} is paired with #{item['B']}"
end

Keys, of course could be retrieved dynamically if you don't want to hard code "A" and "B" using .keys

share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution, but what if items have a third id, "C" ? –  rapidash Jul 24 '12 at 20:48
    
Is it a known third id, or will it be dynamic or arbitrary? I kind of hinted at that with the last line, using the .keys method. You can similarly just get an array of all the values (out of order, since it's a hash) using the .values method. –  Ron Jul 26 '12 at 22:22
add comment

Something like this maybe

<tr><th>A</th><th>B</th></tr>
<% @items.each do |item| %>
  <tr><td><%=item[0].description%></td><td><%=item[1].description%></td></tr>
<% end %>
share|improve this answer
    
This would work, but it seems like it's possible for the array items to get out of order- I need to check the id, or it's possible that I'll get items in the wrong columns. –  rapidash Jul 24 '12 at 18:07
    
Yes- that's the exact problem with this solution- none of the items match up with the column their supposed to, and it's not consistent which column they end up in. –  rapidash Jul 24 '12 at 18:19
    
@rapidash, if this is the case. You will need to parse the data the way you want it to be arranged. Just loop through the items and restructure it the way you like before displaying. –  Hitham S. AlQadheeb Jul 24 '12 at 18:22
    
Is there any way to do that without individually hardcoding ids for each column? I'd prefer it if I could just generate columns based on what's available. –  rapidash Jul 24 '12 at 18:49
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.