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I have this code in my Controller:

public class MyController : Controller
{
  private readonly IMyRepository myRepository;

  public MyController() : this(new MyRepository())
  {}

  public MyController(IMyRepository myRepository)
  {
    this.myRepository = myRepository;
  }

  public ActionResult Index()
  {
    return View(myRepository.GetData());
  }
}

MyRepository uses EF for data operations. Every time user loads this page instance of MyRepository is creating. That means EF context is creating and Fluent API code is executing (OnModelCreating method).

Are there any possibilities not to create EF context everytime when user loads the page?

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1  
Are you sure about that? Have you actually measured the performance impact? –  Erik Funkenbusch Jul 24 '12 at 18:20
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

MyRepository uses EF for data operations. Every time user loads this page instance of MyRepository is creating. That means EF context is creating and Fluent API code is executing (OnModelCreating method).

You're wrong. Put a breakpoint on your OnModelCreating method. This method will only get hit once, when your application loads. It will hit the breakpoint again if you rebuild the project, because this causes the binary dll to be reloaded into the app domain. However if you leave the application running and hit the controller action twice (without rebuilding in between), you will see that OnModelCreating does NOT get hit the second time. Like Serg Rogovtsev says, EF caches the model (meaning the schema) after it is created during OnModelCreating.

The only objection I have to Serg Rogovtsev's answer is that I would never create a singleton instance of the DbContext. Instead you should use one instance per HttpContext (a.k.a. per web request). If you use it as a singleton, and you have concurrency enabled, you would end up seeing DbConcurrencyExceptions creep up in your app. Use DI/IoC, and create/dispose the DbContext instance at the beginning/end of the request response cycle. That is the best practice. Don't worry about the overhead of creating a new MyDbContext() instance. After EF initializes (warms up) during the first construction, future constructions will be fairly cheap.

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You're right about concurrency problems (and several other implications) of using one instance of DbContext per application (and I was wrong not mentioning it). –  Serg Rogovtsev Jul 24 '12 at 20:35
    
I agree completely. In addition to concurrency errors with singleton Scoped contexts there is also a major performance problem with this approach. EF enumerates all tracked entities on most important operations, if you are using a singleton context you probably aren't clearing out this tracked collection. This means your app will get slower the longer it runs. see blog.staticvoid.co.nz/2012/05/… for why EF is slow with large contexts –  Luke McGregor Jul 24 '12 at 21:36
    
In addition from my testing DbContext creation is ridiculously fast (when you do it several times in a row), its so fast it shouldn't even register on any performance metrics you have in comparison to an actual operation, see blog.staticvoid.co.nz/2012/03/entity-framework-comparative.html for some more details on how fast EF runs –  Luke McGregor Jul 24 '12 at 21:37
    
Great answer! Thanks –  Coffka Jul 25 '12 at 4:26

To answer your question: you can create a singleton of your repository or you can use DI container which will hold single instance for you.

But to the point: if you set breakpoint inside OnModelCreating you will find that it gets called only once per application instance. EntityFramework uses pretty effective model caching. So you don't have to worry about performance hit caused by creation of EF contexts.

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Change your controller so you create an instance of your repository in a lazy way. You can use the Lazy < T > class for example.

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1  
sounds like a lazy approach. –  Har Jul 24 '12 at 18:16
1  
Haha, funny :-) –  Maarten Jul 24 '12 at 18:16
    
+1 for a great response to a ridiculous comment. –  Har Jul 24 '12 at 18:18

In terms of performance I'd favour looking to persist data and not the context, the EF context is optimized to be created and then disposed to free up connections in the pool. Some other EF performance methods at http://www.sql-server-performance.com/2012/entity-framework-performance-optimization/

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Best practice is to dispose the EF context after you've retrieved/updated your data.

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